An Algerian-born al-Qaeda assassin accused of bombing two churches in Pakistan was working as a spy for British and Canadian intelligence before being imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay, according to his secret inmate file released by WikiLeaks.

In Nigeria’s contested presidential election, President Goodluck Jonathan has been reelected, and the reelection of a candidate from the Christian region of southern Nigeria is being received by Muslims in the north with rioting, arson, and murder.

The headline of a Washington Post story on the post-election violence — “Mobs overwhelm police in northern Nigeria after vote, leaving behind charred corpses and fear” — well summarizes the chaos which has erupted in the Muslim states of Nigeria. The story continues, “...[o]fficers recovered 31 corpses from the city of Kaduna alone Tuesday, with more likely yet to be found, the commissioner said. Police arrested more than 300 people during the rioting, but many citizens remained inside their homes as police and military helicopters flew overhead and soldiers filled the streets."

Islamic extremists are continuing to press their advantage in the new, post-Mubarak Egypt, and are now demanding that one of the few Christians serving in the government be removed — or else.

Emad Shehata Michael, a Coptic Christian, is the newly appointed governor of Qena. The act of appointing a Copt as governor was hardly an innovation; according to the Associated Press, his predecessor “was actually a Christian and a former police general as well, but he was appointed by Mubarak and was much reviled for his incompetence, security background, and close ties to the regime, enabling the Salafis to draw on local dissatisfaction in their current campaign.”

United Nations-backed rebel forces, supported by the Obama administration and the French government, arrested Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo at the presidential palace on April 11, installing a Muslim central banker named Alassane Ouattara in his place.

The American Left and the mainstream media touted the Egyptian revolution as a democratic one, even comparing it to the American Revolutionary movement. Perhaps it is for that reason that those same groups are now ignoring all indications that what happened in Egypt was anything but similar to what happened in America in 1776.

Log in