Africa

ObamaPresident Obama has made the "decision" to put American soldiers into harm's way in Libya without the required permission under the U.S. Constitution (or even consulting Congress). American enforcement of the "no-fly zone" will doubtless cost U.S. taxpayers more in defense spending, but the real risk and cost of American military intervention is the risk to the lives of American servicemen and women. Kentucky Senator Rand Paul told George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America on February 22 of Libyan intervention that his standard for deploying U.S. military forces was: "I won't vote to go to war unless I'd send my kids there or go myself."

GadhafiIs Libya one quagmire too far? The United Nations Security Council's passage of a  resolution on March 17 imposing a no-fly zone over Libya is forcing us to confront that burning question. As I write, President Obama has already committed U.S. naval and air assets to "playing a supportive role" to what is, ostensibly, a European-led military initiative. In a meeting at the White House before his public announcement of support for the UN actions, President Obama assured congressional leaders that our participation in the no-fly enforcement would not lead to the deployment of American troops on the ground in Libya.

An attack by militant Muslims which has thus far destroyed at least a dozen churches may signal an expansion in anti-Christian violence in Ethiopia as the next front in the recent escalation of the Jihad’s war against Christianity.

Coptic ChristiansAlthough the Coptic Church in Egypt has suffered varying degrees of persecution for centuries, events in the past few months appear to indicate that the plight of the Christian minority is growing worse as Islamic extremism is on the rise in a nation torn by revolution. While the protests that overthrew the Mubarak regime were given worldwide attention, the violence that is being perpetrated against Christians in the aftermath of these recent events is not receiving a similar level of concern.

LibyaFor all their talk about making the world safe for democracy, Western — and particularly U.S. — leaders seem to give very little weight to public opinion when it comes to intervention in Libya.

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