As unrest in the Middle East bled over into Libya, anti-government protesters were reportedly close to controlling Benghazi, the nation’s second largest city, with the security forces under dictator Moammar Gadhafi fighting for control of Tripoli’s city center. Speaking for his father, Gadhafi’s son, Seif al-Islam, warned that the unrest in the country was on the verge of exploding into civil war.

Somali thugs have hijacked the yacht of a couple who were in the middle of a sea voyage to take Bibles to other countries. As reported by the Associated Press, the yacht, called the Quest (photo, left), was taken on February 18, “two days after a Somali pirate was sentenced to 33 years in prison by a New York court for the 2009 hijacking of the Maersk Alabama.” That hijacking came to an abrupt end when Navy snipers killed two pirates holding the ship’s captain.

Emboldened by the fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, a key ally of the United States, other pro-American regimes in the region are quickly coming to realize that their countries are not immune to the revolutionary fervor that has swept through the Middle East. In Bahrain, protests to topple the monarchy continue today, as protesters mourn the deaths of five fellow demonstrators killed the day before in a violent clash with the kingdom’s military.

This past Wednesday as Egyptian society slowly returned to normality, the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces appointed Tareq al-Bishry, a retired judge, to head the Constitutional Amendment Committee authorized to redraft six articles of the constitution within a period of 10 days.

With the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak at the unrelenting demands of Egyptian protestors, the fate of Egypt still remains perilous. And when it seemed as if the situation could not degenerate further, now at least 1,500 workers from the Suez Canal Authority have protested over wage conditions and lack of equality.

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