Omar SuleimanAs expected, Egypt’s Vice President Omar Suleiman met with opposition leaders on Sunday for the first time and agreed to a number of concessions, including the release of those taken into custody since the start of the anti-government protests and the lifting of the country’s emergency laws, which were imposed by Mubarak in 1981 and have been enforced ever since.

As the world focuses its attention on the events transpiring in Tunisia and Egypt, the flames of revolution continue to sweep through the Middle East — particularly in Yemen, where radical Islamist and socialist forces have come together to topple yet another pro-Western state.

After days of violent clashes between pro- and anti-Mubarak forces in Egypt, today is relatively serene as Egypt’s defense minister met with some of the anti-government protesters, who are preparing for what they’ve dubbed the “Day of Departure,” a final push for the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak’s government.

pyramidEgyptian President Hosni Mubarak knows exactly what caused his downfall after 30 years of autocratic rule: the Internet. This marvelous communication tool — perhaps the greatest since the invention of the printing press, which had similar effects — exposed Mubarak to the world as a corrupt, tyrannical lackey of the United States, the result of billions upon billions of dollars in unconstitutional American aid to his regime.

The anger of protesters in Egypt, reportedly aimed at a number of issues including President Hosni Mubarak’s failure to indicate whether he plans to seek re-election, should have been assuaged to a degree by the President's announcement that he will not be seeking re-election at the end of his term in September. Unfortunately for Mubarak, it was not. Video footage of crowd reactions to Mubarak’s announcement reveal the people chanting "No!" "No!" "No!"

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