Africa

In the aftermath of a Christmas season filled with anti-Christian violence in Nigeria, Iraq, and Egypt, Christian leaders around the world have called for prayers for those undergoing persecution, and have also called upon the governments that have thus far proven impotent to stop such attacks to step up to their responsibility to protect their citizens.

History is set to be made in Southern Sudan as its people are widely expected to vote for independence from the North in a referendum that is now ongoing. But tensions are intensifying along the proposed border, which runs through some of the most fertile land in the country.

In the aftermath of the attack by Muslim terrorists on a church in Alexandria, Egypt, new revelations are casting further doubt on claims by the Mubarak government that “all Egypt is the target” of the bombings, and not just members of the Coptic Christian community.

JesusThis year’s Christmastide has been marked by widespread Jihadist terrorism against the Christian Church. Numerous attacks against churches in Nigeria were among the first to draw international attention, but the violence was by no means limited to one country. In Iraq, church leaders had decided to downplay Christmas observances out of fear of a repetition of the October 31 massacre at Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad; the public celebration of Christmas was virtually canceled. However, such prudence was unable to avert the violent intentions of Muslim terrorists, who chose instead to launch attacks on Christians homes throughout Baghdad. As Iraqi priest who presided at the funeral of an elderly couple murdered in the attacks, Fr. Nadhir Dakko, declared: “Iraq is bleeding every day.”

students in South AfricaSouth Africa’s public school system, like most government school systems, is a disaster. According to the Associated Press’s Donna Bryson, “Only a third of third-graders in South Africa meet the minimum literacy and numeracy standards, according to national test results. Last year, a third of those taking final-year exams failed.” Bryson quotes the country’s education minister, Angie Motshekga: “We must acknowledge that there is poor teaching in many of our schools. Management in our schools is often weak and lacks leadership and commitment. Our systems are also often inefficient.”

Log in