At least four American officials including U.S. Ambassador to Libya John Christopher Stevens are reportedly dead after outraged Islamist mobs attacked U.S. diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya on September 11. The frenzied hordes were apparently upset about an online film made by an Israeli-American that ridicules the Islamic Prophet Mohammed as a savage pedophile. Experts, however, say it is much broader than that.

At its 24th Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, the powerful Socialist International alliance approved resolutions blasting Israel, demanding more “global governance,” and calling for a program of massive wealth redistribution on a national and international scale. The controversial group, made up of socialist and communist-leaning political parties from around the globe, also insisted that governments in countries not yet destroyed by socialism must continue to send their taxpayers’ money to Third World regimes.

The powerful global alliance known as the Socialist International held its 24th Congress calling for bigger and more centralized global governance as well as more handouts from productive economies. Meanwhile, the summit host, South Africa’s ruling African National Congress (ANC), is facing mounting international pressure over the genocide of white farmers and its increasingly overt communist ambitions.

With long-time strongman Hosni Mubarak out of power, Egypt appears to be descending into a fresh brand of totalitarianism led by its newly elected president, the radical Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohammed Morsi. Analysts say that on paper, at least, Morsi is now more powerful than even Mubarak: The new Islamist head of state has assumed legislative powers, attacked the media, installed his own supporters to lead the nation’s powerful military after firing its previous leaders, and even seized more control over the process to draft a new constitution. 

Opponents and liberty-minded activists are up in arms over the fact that the genocidal mass-murderer ruling over Sudan, Omar al-Bashir, is set to be elected to the United Nations Human Rights Council. Observers said the move will further discredit an institution that has already become a laughing stock around the world for appointing so many communist and Islamic dictatorships as supposed guardians of human rights.

Critics from across the political spectrum are already protesting the latest development. But analysts say that with the broad support of governments in the region and backing from the so-called “African Union,” the Sudanese war criminal’s appointment to the UN so-called “human rights” entity is now virtually assured without a massive wave of opposition.