After nearly two years of support from the Obama administration for the “Arab Spring” movement that Islamists used to gain power, the new president of Egypt is rewarding his American ally with the retort: “You’re not an ally — you’re a friend.”

A September 22 article for the New York Times highlights a host of problems with the relationship between the United States and Egypt with its headline: “Egypt’s New Leader Spells Out Terms for U.S.-Arab Ties.” Egypt — the most powerful nation to have its previous government swept away by an Islamist insurgency in the past two years — is now set forth as the gatekeeper to American foreign policy in the entire region. And the relationship between the United States and Egypt will now be determined by that party which had been previously perceived to be the junior partner.

The new regime of Muslim central banker Alassane Ouattara, installed in the Ivory Coast using United Nations troops backed by the Obama administration, suspended all of the country’s opposition newspapers and is reportedly leading a vicious crackdown on political opponents. Human rights activists and Western diplomats spoke out against the assaults, leading to a temporary lifting of the media suspensions this week. But trouble is still brewing.

The labor unrest surrounding South African mining is continuing to spread as accusations about who is responsible fly in all directions and international pressure against the ruling regime over the accelerating genocide of white farmers expands. Security officials and military forces raided miner shanty towns over the weekend to confiscate weapons from strikers, but the chaos is still spreading.

At least a thousand soldiers have been deployed to support the embattled police force as the ruling African National Congress (ANC) regime and its communist partners seek to blame business for the tensions. Observers even within South Africa’s ruling alliance, however, say the unrest is being carefully orchestrated by power-hungry elements within the communist-backed ANC itself.

 

At least four American officials including U.S. Ambassador to Libya John Christopher Stevens are reportedly dead after outraged Islamist mobs attacked U.S. diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya on September 11. The frenzied hordes were apparently upset about an online film made by an Israeli-American that ridicules the Islamic Prophet Mohammed as a savage pedophile. Experts, however, say it is much broader than that.

At its 24th Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, the powerful Socialist International alliance approved resolutions blasting Israel, demanding more “global governance,” and calling for a program of massive wealth redistribution on a national and international scale. The controversial group, made up of socialist and communist-leaning political parties from around the globe, also insisted that governments in countries not yet destroyed by socialism must continue to send their taxpayers’ money to Third World regimes.