With the ascension of the Muslim Brotherhood to power and relinquishing of power by the military, Egypt's military will no longer be able to arrest protesters, but critics wonder whether the Brotherhood can be trusted with its newly acquired power.

After 16 months of conspiracy theories directed against the Egyptian military predicting that the "democratic process" would be subverted to keep allies of former President Hosni Mubarak in power, the commission overseeing that nation’s presidential election has declared Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi the victor.

With both candidates in the Egyptian presidential election claiming victory, while the commission overseeing the elections delays releasing the results, Egypt faces the possibility of further revolutionary chaos.

Approximately 18 months after the "Arab Spring" uprising began in Egypt, the final outcome of the rebellion that ended the reign of President Hosni Mubarak remains to be seen. With press reports of a small turnout in Egypt’s runoff presidential elections that are intended to pick the successor of a man who led his nation for three decades, it is possible that the nation’s electorate may be choosing “none of the above.”

As Egyptians await word of the outcome of the the weekend's runnoff elections for a new president for their nation, the fate of the Egypt seems more uncertain than at any time since the “Arab Spring.” Only months ago, the Muslim Brotherhood had allegedly been plotting to export their Islamist revolution to neighboring countries. Now, a panel of judges has dissolved the new parliament, and is permitting Egypt’s former prime minister to run for President.