Approximately 18 months after the "Arab Spring" uprising began in Egypt, the final outcome of the rebellion that ended the reign of President Hosni Mubarak remains to be seen. With press reports of a small turnout in Egypt’s runoff presidential elections that are intended to pick the successor of a man who led his nation for three decades, it is possible that the nation’s electorate may be choosing “none of the above.”

As Egyptians await word of the outcome of the the weekend's runnoff elections for a new president for their nation, the fate of the Egypt seems more uncertain than at any time since the “Arab Spring.” Only months ago, the Muslim Brotherhood had allegedly been plotting to export their Islamist revolution to neighboring countries. Now, a panel of judges has dissolved the new parliament, and is permitting Egypt’s former prime minister to run for President.

Recent civilian killings at the hands of the Syrian government are prompting some to call for military intervention in the country. General Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, has stated that these recent deaths of over 100 Syrians — including 49 children and 34 women — may be enough to trigger involvement of U.S. troops.

With several leading candidates closely tied to the Mubarak regime, Egyptians are casting their ballots in the first presidential election since the “Arab Spring.” And with balloting taking place and the election results likely to be released next week, the two frontrunners are men with a background which may fall short of the expectations of many Islamist extremists.

Islamists haven taken to the streets of Cairo in the aftermath of an elections committee removing several top candidates on the basis of terrorism convictions and other violations of Egyptian election law.

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