Khairat al-ShaterWith Islamist extremists facing opposition as they consolidate their power within Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood is looking abroad in the hope of gaining some unlikely allies. The Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party may have reneged on its promise to stay out of Egypt’s presidential election, and has driven Coptic Christians off the commission charged with drafting their nation’s new constitution, but promises of business opportunities may win the support of foreign businesses that see an opportunity to make a profit.

As concern grows within Egypt and abroad that the Muslim Brotherhood (emblem at left) is seeking for itself the same concentration of power which it once denounced when it was wielded by former President Hosni Mubarak, the handful of dissident voices within the new constitutional committee are resigning in protest.

The future of Egypt in the aftermath of last year’s “Arab Spring” is being written by the dominant Islamist organization in that nation, the Muslim Brotherhood. Since the fall of the Mubarak government in February 2011, the Muslim Brotherhood has been steadily establishing itself as the center of power in the new Egypt. In the process, the organization is now preparing to break a crucial promise that its leadership made last year: The Muslim Brotherhood is now seeking to install one of its own as president of Egypt.

As the Muslim Brotherhood continues building a future for Egypt that would place that nation in the ranks of the radical Islamist regimes, the U.S. State Department is still downplaying the course of events in the aftermath of the “Arab Spring.” But as the Egyptian government begins the process of drafting a new national constitution, it is clear that Islamists will dominate the process [see related article at end of this article].

As Islamists solidify their control over Egypt in the aftermath of the “Arab Spring” of 2011, the chief law enforcement officer in Dubai is warning that the new rulers of Egypt plan to export their revolution to his country —and beyond.

As reported earlier this month for The New American, two radical Islamist political parties — the Muslim Brotherhood (emblem at left) and the Salafist Al-Nour party — have recently taken control of the Egyptian parliament following elections in that country:

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