Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's motorcade faced a barrage of tomatoes, shoes, and protesters in her visit to Cairo, Egypt July 16. Some Egyptian protesters charged that the U.S. government had supported the Muslim Brotherhood in the Islamic nation's recent presidential election, though it's unclear if the Obama administration did provide support for any party.

If the definition of the word “terrorist” has seemed somewhat flexible to many Americans in recent years, that state of befuddlement is shared by the U.S. government. The difficulties of defining a “terrorist” were on display on Capitol Hill when a high-ranking State Department official declared that the Nigerian Jihadist group Boko Haram — one of the most violent Islamist organizations in Africa — to be a “terrorist” organization, while explaining that it was not a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO).

Despite violence that left at least several dead, numerous gun battles, allegations of voter fraud, dozens of polling places unable to operate, mass protests, militias running wild, and whole regions still in chaos, Western governments and the United Nations — largely responsible for the recent “regime change” that killed dictator Moammar Gadhafi and thousands of innocent civilians — celebrated political elections in Libya July 7 as a success. Meanwhile, multiple armed factions are still threatening to unleash full-blown civil war amid ongoing battles all across the chaos-stricken nation.

Newly-elected Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi shocked the Obama administration with a call for the release of the release of Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman, the terrorist associated with the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

With the ascension of the Muslim Brotherhood to power and relinquishing of power by the military, Egypt's military will no longer be able to arrest protesters, but critics wonder whether the Brotherhood can be trusted with its newly acquired power.

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