The recent wave of Islamic terrorism and radicalism in the Middle East, from the Arab Spring to the recent September 11, 2012 Benghazi and Cairo attacks, which led to the murder of U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and two Navy Seals, were not the work of spontaneous attacks, but rather the result of a decades-long carefully planned Soviet operation by former KGB chief and Soviet leader Yuri Andropov to bring about communist revolution.

United Nations chief Ban Ki-moon called for an end to arms shipments to both sides in Syria’s brutal war between Western-backed rebels and the Bashir al-Assad dictatorship before the conflict spirals out of control. In a speech at the UN General Assembly, however, President Obama promised to continue supporting the jihadist rebellion with U.S. taxpayer funds until the Syrian regime surrenders. Other governments were divided on whether diplomacy or military intervention would be most appropriate.

A small archipelago in the East China Sea — known to Japan as the Senkaku Islands and to China as the Diaoyu Islands — is at the center of a series of increasingly angry anti-Japanese demonstrations in China as Japan claims that the tiny islands, which are controlled by China, belong to Japan.

 

 

 

China has made tremendous strides in the world economy in the last 30 years, and many are predicting this progress to continue. But China has possibly insurmountable problems.

An Islamist mob stormed the U.S. embassy in Yemen’s capital city of Sana’a, torching a building after tearing down the American flag and setting it on fire. The latest incident, like the September 11 attacks on American diplomatic missions in Egypt and Libya, was widely reported to have been sparked by outrage over a crude YouTube video depicting the Islamic Prophet Mohammed as a barbarian pedophile.

Multiple analysts, however, suggested the violence may actually be a manifestation of “blowback” against the U.S. government’s lawless foreign policy.

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