“We want blood for blood.” Those were the last words of Shumaila Faheem, who committed suicide after swallowing poison pills on Sunday, February 6 as a protest affirming her belief that she would never receive justice for her husband's killing from the present regime.

Physical torture, abuse, forced abductions, sexual harassment, forced marriages, and other brutal practices are everyday events in the Islamic republic of Pakistan. Women in Pakistan still face daunting hardships in the male-dominated society. Although seemingly every other day the government announces plans to secure the rights of women — it has been of no use. Torture incidents are still the highlight of the media on a regular basis.

While Islamist extremism is advancing in Pakistan and Egypt, one of the bastions of the Jihadist ideology is facing a challenge its mullahs are having a hard time countering: the Christian Church is growing in Iran.

A Pakistani lawmaker who had worked to reform her nation’s harsh blasphemy law has abandoned that effort, at least for the moment. Sherry Rehman, a member of Pakistan’s parliament, had authored a bill for the National Assembly that would have removed the death sentence as a form of punishment for blasphemy against Mohammed.

Raymond Davis, a member of the U.S. embassy's technical administrative staff in Lahore, Pakistan, has been remanded by Lahore's district court for six days on double murder charges stemming from a January 28 incident in which he shot and killed two alleged robbers in Mazang market in Lahore, Pakistan's second-largest city.  A third citizen was crushed to death by a U.S. consulate car as officials came to rescue Davis from an angry mob.