As Pakistan slides further in the direction of Islamic extremism, and anti-Christian violence is on the rise in Iraq and Egypt, Congress may soon consider legislation which may increase the level of American intervention in such conflicts. 

The United States of America, with the support of allied countries, attacked Afghanistan on October 7, 2001, formally commencing the “war on terror.” By so doing, the international community agreed to eliminate the terror and extremism that were responsible for the 9/11 attacks.

Romel Hawal was born in Habbaniya Cece, Iraq, 48 years ago. Most of the population then was Christian. Now Hawal may become part of a long exodus of Christians out of Iraq. There are no Christian services in the town any longer and his 11-year-old son knows no other Christians outside his family. “When my son swears," Hawai mourns, "it is on the Koran, not the Bible. Whenever I look at him my heart breaks. He is my closest friend. I just want him to live a normal life where he can practice Christian traditions.”

Missing persons are a major human-rights issue in various countries. One niche of the missing persons saga is Asian nationals who went missing after 9/11, kidnapped by the world’s intelligence agencies. There are hundreds of people who went missing in the last several years from Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippine, China, Thailand, and Singapore.

According to the Indian Express, India sought a UN ban on the Pakistani group Jamatud Dawa (JD) after evidence showed that it is a front for Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), an Pakistan-based Islamist terrorist group operating in Asia. LeT is suspected of being behind the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India which left 165 dead and scores wounded.