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If our military is any indication, it just may be true that there are no atheists in a foxhole. The armed forces have long seemed to be an arena wherein faith runs strong, and while this is laudable, it also creates problems with today’s secular civilian authorities and top brass. One example of this disconnect has just played out, with a recent story about how American soldiers in Afghanistan were skirting military rules by engaging in shadow proselytization. Military.com reports:

pakistan talibanPakistani fighter jets and helicopters struck Taliban positions in the country's Swat Valley on May 7 as the military continued its offensive against Taliban militants. A peace accord announced on February 16 — according to which Pakistan’s government agreed to a system of strict Islamic law, or sharia, in Swat in return for the Taliban’s promise to end insurgent violence and disarm — collapsed last month. Taliban gunmen, instead of laying down their arms as agreed, advanced to within 60 miles of the capital, Islamabad. U.S. officials, concerned that the Taliban were using Northwest Pakistan as a staging area against U.S. operations in neighboring Afghanista denounced the accord, saying the government was appeasing the militants.

PakistanBack in February, Gen. David McKiernan, commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, predicted that the additional 17,000 U.S. troops scheduled to be sent to Afghanistan would remain there for three to five years. The additional 17,000 troops would bring total U.S. troop strength in Afghanistan up to around 55,000, and an AP article in the Army Times for February 19 reported that still another 10,000 U.S. soldiers could be sent to Afghanistan in the future.

North KoreaIn the midst of an economic crisis and worries over a global epidemic, North Korea’s creaky totalitarian state continues to occupy headline news. North Korea, arguably the last Stalinist regime on Earth, has, over the past decade, conducted three long-range missile tests — none of which has come remotely close to demonstrating an ability to reach even western Alaska, much less deliver a payload to the continental United States — and carried out a single, low-yield nuclear test that apparently was only partly successful. Now the North Koreans are threatening more missile and nuclear tests unless the UN Security Council apologizes for tightening sanctions over the latest missile launch.

timal tigersThe long-running war in Sri Lanka, the impoverished Indian Ocean nation suspended like a tropical teardrop below India’s southern tip, appears to be near an end. The secessionist war between the Tamil Tigers of Eelam (LTTE) and the majority Sinhalese government has attracted sporadic international attention over the years, but never the sort of sustained intervention that has taken place in the Balkans or in the Middle East.

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