George Mitchell ObamaThe world's attention remained focused on the Middle East during the week of January 25, as President Barack Obama met with his special envoy to the region, former Senator George J. Mitchell, and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the White House on Monday. Obama also taped his first interview with an Arab television station, directed to the Islamic world, that day. The interview, taped in the White House map room, was broadcast on Tuesday on Al Arabiya, a 24-hour Arabic-language news channel in Dubai. As the interview was aired in the Muslim world, Mitchell arrived in Egypt to begin an eight-day foreign tour that will continue with Israel, Jordan, the West Bank, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia, before moving on to France and the United Kingdom.

General David Petraeus, commander of the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) in the Middle East, met Afghan President Hamid Karzai at the presidential palace in Kabul on the night of January 20-21, after announcing that arrangements had been made to establish new transport routes into Afghanistan from Central Asia.

On January 18, the militant Hamas regime that rules Gaza agreed to a one-week cease-fire with Israel. With three weeks of military action by Israel against Hamas brought to a halt, observers are taking stock of the devastating conditions in Gaza and trying to determine if Israel has accomplished its objective of neutralizing  Hamas, which is categorized as a terrorist organization by the United States, Canada, the European Union, Israel, and Japan.

GazaKhaled Meshaal, a Hamas leader, told the attendees at an emergency Arab summit on the Gaza crisis being held in Doha, the capital of Qatar, on January  16: "I assure you: despite all the destruction in Gaza, we will not accept Israel's conditions for a cease-fire."

Gaza, Israeli MilitaryAs the Israeli military intensified its ongoing assault against the Hamas terrorist organization in densely populated Gaza City on January 15, artillery shells struck the compound of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), drawing immediate criticism from UN Secretary-General Ban ki-Moon, who called the attack an "outrage."