There’s a knock on your door. Upon responding, you see two police officers who inform you, “We’ve come to inspect your firearms and look over your place, sir." This is now a reality for gun owners in Britain. Will such intrusion soon be coming to a state near you? 

The bankrupt Socialist rulers of France are under attack by the monster they helped create and empower. This week, French officials are facing off against European Union finance bosses over a bloated national government budget — EU bosses say the numbers must be slashed before they can be “approved” by Brussels, but French politicians are refusing. Without a resolution to the conflict, the European Commission — a sort of hybrid legislative and executive branch run largely by armies of unaccountable bureaucrats — might overrule Paris and reject its proposed spending spree for next year.

As Switzerland’s central bank engages in controversial monetary-policy gimmicks to keep the Swiss franc from rising, voters will have an opportunity to start reining in the scheming next month. On November 30, the wealthy Alpine nation — among the last in the world to decouple its currency from gold — will hold a referendum on whether to force the Swiss National Bank (SNB) to hold a fixed portion of its assets in the precious metal. If approved, the implications for Switzerland, gold prices, precious-metals manipulation, and perhaps even the global fiat-currency regime could be enormous, analysts say.

 

 

 

 

Arkady Rotenberg and other pals of Putin may get reimbursed for any Western sanctions, while less favored oligarchs in the Russian billionaire club are taking a fall.

If you question the government narrative about terror attacks like the one that occurred on September 11, or believe in religious prophecies about the end times, or dispute the legitimacy of your rulers, or hold any sort of views that politicians consider “extremist,” watch out. Last week, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron told the United Nations and its largely autocratic member regimes that the perpetual terror war requires far more than just crackdowns on violence and terrorism. Now, as the terror war becomes increasingly globalized and fanatical, what Cameron described as “non-violent extremism” all over the world is in the crosshairs, too.

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