With terrorists rampaging through Paris for a second time this week after gunmen massacred 12 victims in the Charlie Hebdo attack, at least four more victims are dead as panic grows across the city and even the nation of France. And thanks to draconian gun-control laws severely infringing on the French people’s right to keep and bear arms, actual and potential victims of the ongoing slaughter have been left largely defenseless, to cower in the face of Islamists armed with Kalashnikovs and other weaponry. Despite all of that, rather than discussing respect for gun-rights and liberty, experts say it is unlikely that the people of France under Socialist Party rule will be able to lawfully protect themselves any time soon.

When Bishop Johan Bonny, the Catholic Bishop of Antwerp, Belgium, publicly called for the Catholic Church to bless same-sex “relationships,” in a recent interview, a rebuke from the Flemish Catholic Student Association of Antwerp was not long in coming. And, in turn, the Catholic student group has come under attack from a militant socialist youth group, which (predictably) accused the Catholic students of being “homophobic” and called on the Belgian government to take action against them.

After turning France into a global laughingstock of failed Big Government schemes and further damaging the nation’s already battered economy and reputation, the French Socialist Party’s infamous 75 percent “supertax” on the rich is set to die a quiet death on February 1. Despite the pro-wealth-confiscation ideological leanings of deeply unpopular Socialist French President Francois Hollande and his radical comrades, analysts said authorities in France appear to be finally acknowledging reality — and may now even understand that ending the massive tax scheme and scaling back draconian restrictions on economic freedom will be essential in attempting to revive the struggling economy, if not in preserving some semblance of a political future for the Socialist Party.

Some German politicians and religious leaders are recommending that Muslim songs be sung in Christian churches — during Christmas services.

The UK’s Supreme Court handed down a decision on December 17 that overturned a previous ruling made in favor of two midwives in greater Glasgow, Scotland, who had objected to being forced to supervise abortions in the Southern General Hospital in Glasgow where both worked as labor ward coordinators.