Hundreds — possibly thousands — of patients have died from lack of care in British hospitals, according to government investigations.

Leaders of European Union nations met for a two-day summit in Brussels on February 7, in an attempt to reach a seven-year spending agreement. 

As reported by the New York Times, a lawsuit filed in Britain by the family of an innocent victim of a U.S. drone strike may be giving allies a reason to reconsider their participation in the deadly program.

 

In a major victory for taxpayers in Iceland, an obscure transnational court ruled against the European Union and a similar supranational body last week, deciding that the tiny population of the island nation was not responsible for the massive liabilities of a private Icelandic bank that went bust during the 2008 economic meltdown. Establishment analysts blasted the decision as a “blow to global banking,” but Icelanders and proponents of the free market celebrated the verdict as a big win for the people and market principles — after all, they argue, citizens should not be forced to pay for the reckless and potentially criminal actions of a few bankers, widely criticized as “banksters” in recent years.

 

 

The Russian city of Volgograd renames itself Stalingrad for five days a year, after Soviet communist dictator Joseph Stalin, in order to commemorate historic World War II events.

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