Winston Churchill might have been voted the greatest Englishman ever in 2008, but quoting him in 2014 can get you arrested — as the leader of the U.K.'s Liberty GB party learned the hard way.

You’re free in Sweden to be critical of immigration, those in power, or people identifying as “LBGT” — at least within the confines of your mind. But dare express those views, even on the Internet, and you can be more easily prosecuted under a new law taking full effect after Christmas.

Widespread news accounts of handbills being circulated in the troubled eastern Ukraine province of Donetsk calling for registration of all Jews with a putative separatist government may have been a hoax, according to a report in The New Republic magazine.

As outrage grows among European Union bosses over Swiss voters’ February decision to curb mass immigration into Switzerland, German President Joachim Gauck warned that self-government by the people is “dangerous.” Switzerland is not a member of the EU, but that has not stopped officials in Germany and across the European Union from going into meltdown mode against their independent neighbor and brazenly terrorizing the Swiss with increasingly outrageous threats over their decision to limit immigration. Gauck’s attack on Switzerland’s system of constitutional self-government, though, is among the most extreme thus far, and it has infuriated citizens all across the political spectrum.

Barack Obama's praise for the "Swedish model" leads some to believe that he would like the United States to emulate it. But given that even just questioning immigration can bring persecution in Sweden, the Swedish "perfect society" may not be so perfect after all.

 

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