You are here: HomeWorld NewsEurope

Europe

Representatives from Iran and six world powers are meeting in Geneva on October 15 and 16 to discuss Iran’s nuclear program. The powers include the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Russia, and China.

Angela Merkel’s double-speaking and flip-flopping on EU bailouts, EU control from Brussels, support for U.S.-backed foreign wars — and much more — should have insured her defeat, but the German Chancellor’s powerful allies in the media, banking, and politics have shielded her with a Teflon coat. 

Voters in Switzerland will head to the polls on Sunday to decide whether the Alpine nation should continue with its military draft or rely solely on volunteers to man its military forces.

Authorities in Poland last week announced the confiscation of bonds held in private pension funds without compensation, implausibly claiming that the move did not amount to a nationalization of the assets. While Polish officials engaged in rhetorical games and semantics to conceal the severity of the “transfer” of privately owned assets to a “state pension vehicle” known as ZUS, the controversial move is still fueling confusion and fierce criticism from analysts and economists. Some experts fear other governments may follow suit. 

As the deeply unpopular Brussels-based European Union continues to usurp unprecedented powers over citizens and formerly sovereign national governments, another example of the EU gone wild just hit the headlines. Under its latest controversial scheming, supposedly aimed at improving “road safety,” all civilian cars within the 28-member state bloc could be fitted with a device to prevent speeding — essentially preventing any speed in excess of 70 miles per hour.

Sign up for The New American daily highlights