The austerity measures being debated in the Greek parliament are being met with resistance not only by the opposition party but by those most directly affected: Greek workers. At least 20,000 people have begun a 48-hour general strike, bringing to a halt most airlines and public transportation. Even workers at the state-owned monopoly, Public Power Corp. SA, are forcing power outages around the country.

Geert Wilders (left), member of the Dutch Parliament's Party of Freedom who was criminally prosecuted for speaking out about the Islamic immigration and integration problem in the Netherlands, has been acquitted of "hate speech" crimes. During a public debate about Muslim integration and multiculturalism, Wilders had declared, “The core problem is the fascist Islam, the sick ideology of Allah and Mohammed as laid down in the Islamic Mein Kampf, the Quran.” The presiding judge found that his remarks were “at the edge of what’s legally permissible,” "hurtful," "offensive," and of an “inciting character.” But the court declared that, given the context of his comments, his speech did not constitute a criminal act.

Should people of faith be allowed to practice their beliefs without the interference of government?  Christians in America have been wondering about that for several decades now. When a crèche cannot be shown in the public park, while a menorah can and when a voluntary school prayer before a football game is outlawed by federal judges, then Christians have to wonder just how far their right of faith extends.

Muslim sex gangs are collecting English girls on the streets of London and turning them into sex slaves, the Daily Mail recently reported, and "British" Pakistanis are nearly exclusively responsible for the unspeakable crimes.

The latest trial for such a crime began last week, the Mail reports. Yet this gang is hardly the only one.

News reports in the Mail and elsewhere suggest that Muslim-controlled sex slavery is quotidian routine, along with the proliferation of burqas and marching for Sharia law, in merry old England.

During his interview with Charlie Rose on Bloomberg TV Monday night, Alan Greenspan, former chairman of the Federal Reserve, commented that the chances of Greece defaulting are “so high that you almost have to say there’s no way out … the chances of Greece not defaulting are very small.”