Europe

 

Writers for The Wall Street Journal’s lead article on Tuesday expressed surprise that Greece’s fiscal problems are “coming to the boil once more.” After all, when Greece went hat in hand to members of the eurozone last year, they were able to secure a $158 billion bailout whose strings attached required severe austerity measures on the Greek citizens to resolve the matter. The matter has obviously not been resolved, and Greece is back to the table, asking for more assistance. This time it’s a much tougher sell. 

As the now-infamous case of Swedish homeschooler Domenic Johansson (at left, with his parents) — seized by authorities because of homeschooling almost two years ago — continues to drag on through the judicial system, a group of the family’s supporters turned out at an appeal in Stockholm on May 11 to express their hope that the family would be reunited soon.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is the subject of a criminal complaint after commenting publicly that she was “glad” Osama bin Laden had been killed, with the judge who filed the charge accusing her of violating Germany’s law against rewarding or approving of crimes — in this case, homicide. If convicted, she could face up to three years in prison.

There seems no end to the Greek tragedy unfolding within the European Union. One year after a staggering €110-billion ($160-billion) bailout by the European Union barely saved Greece from bankruptcy, EU and IMF officials are meeting in Greece to consider another bailout in hopes of solving the ancient nation's massive debt crisis. 

Last May's bailout engineered by European Union politicians was roughly €10,000 for every man, woman, and child in Greece, or approximately half of its entire gross domestic product for a year. 

Opinions differ widely among nations as to which voting system is best: the American arrangement wherein two-parties are dominant or the multi-party system in Europe and so many other countries. If a country has a multi-party system, it must choose whether it will be a "first-past-the-post" method, in which the candidate with a plurality of the votes wins, or a system by which seats are apportioned according to political party slates.   

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