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Saturday’s revelations by the German newspaper Der Spiegel that U.S. agents placed bugs in European Union officials’ offices in New York and Washington and hacked into EU headquarters in Brussels have ignited a firestorm of indignation among German and European officials.

As anti-government protests that began on May 28 continued in Istanbul on June 11, hundreds of riot police breached barricades set up by protesters in the Turkish city’s Taksim Square, using non-lethal weapons such as tear gas, rubber bullets, and water cannons to control the area. The protests started as a demonstration against the replacement of Istanbul’s Taksim Gezi Park with a reconstruction of the historic Taksim Military Barracks, then morphed into larger protests and riots across Turkey against what many regard as the authoritarian rule of Islamist Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his elected government.

 

As national sovereignty increasingly becomes a thing of the past for most Europeans, the controversial European Union is taking the British government to court in an effort to force taxpayers to supply more welfare for immigrants in the United Kingdom. Analysts, however, say the move is likely to backfire, with fuel essentially being poured on the fire as escalating anti-EU fervor sweeps across Britain ahead of a promised public vote on secession.  

 

 

 

 

The secretive Bilderberg meetings that took place over the weekend in Watford, England, drew protesters from around the world and seemingly unprecedented amounts of media coverage in the international press — a stark contrast with decades of near-total silence surrounding the controversial annual gathering of some of the planet’s most powerful figures in politics, business, military, academia, banking, and more. As usual, however, virtually nothing is known publicly about the agenda or what went on behind the veil of secrecy surrounding the entire conference. 

 

 

In a remarkably candid assessment of the IMF's failure to rescue Greece from its follies, the IMF staff's report still misses the most important lesson of all: Free people left alone will find solutions to their problems.

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