While many American and European politicians have responded to the Jihad currently being waged against the West either by denying its Islamic character, or by seeking to engage in endless wars against the Jihad around the globe, Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders (left) is striving for the freedom of Europeans to live in their own countries without the fear of sharia law being imposed on them. Wilders’ reward for his efforts has been a charges of "bigotry" and criminal prosecution.

Using the strange excuse of compromising terror investigations, London's metro police refuse to release a list of informants in the unsolved case of Jack the Ripper. The Ripper murders occurred in 1888 in Whitechapel, a run-down section of London now populated mostly by Bengalis.

 

Writers for The Wall Street Journal’s lead article on Tuesday expressed surprise that Greece’s fiscal problems are “coming to the boil once more.” After all, when Greece went hat in hand to members of the eurozone last year, they were able to secure a $158 billion bailout whose strings attached required severe austerity measures on the Greek citizens to resolve the matter. The matter has obviously not been resolved, and Greece is back to the table, asking for more assistance. This time it’s a much tougher sell. 

As the now-infamous case of Swedish homeschooler Domenic Johansson (at left, with his parents) — seized by authorities because of homeschooling almost two years ago — continues to drag on through the judicial system, a group of the family’s supporters turned out at an appeal in Stockholm on May 11 to express their hope that the family would be reunited soon.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is the subject of a criminal complaint after commenting publicly that she was “glad” Osama bin Laden had been killed, with the judge who filed the charge accusing her of violating Germany’s law against rewarding or approving of crimes — in this case, homicide. If convicted, she could face up to three years in prison.