Last month, while still in the midst of turmoil, the people of Albania commemorated the 20th anniversary of the alleged fall of Communism in their country.

On February 20, Albania’s ruling Democratic Party, led by Prime Minister Sali Berisha, announced to a crowd of 300,000 supporters in the capital city of Tirana that just 20 years earlier “Albania managed to bring down the fiercest communism regime in Europe,” referring to the 40-year reign of communist dictator Enver Hoxha.

Government “death panels” may still be years if not decades away here in the United States. But in Great Britain, which has suffered under socialized medicine since 1948, such panels — unlike the patients whose treatment they have denied — are alive and well. Despite the government’s best efforts to get them to pay for lifesaving cancer treatments, they continue to withhold these drugs on the basis that they cost too much, according to a report in the London Sunday Telegraph.

Located on the on the 23rd floor of the high-rise Viru Hotel in the Estonian city of Tallinn are strange “stacks of metal cases with black knobs and dials [that] look like something from a 1950s sci-fi movie — in fact, they were once highly secret communications equipment used by the feared Soviet secret police, the KGB,” during the Cold War, Reuters reported.

According to a report published by MigrationWatch UK, the nation’s current immigration rate of approximately a migrant a minute arriving in Great Britain could mean that by 2060, “white British” would be a minority in the United Kingdom. This fundamental, demographic shift is not an accident; rather, the watch group asserts that it is the result of a deliberate policy of the Labour Party.

In the face of ongoing political pressure from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, the President of Iceland has once again asserted the right of the Icelandic people to defend their nation from foreign financial schemes which would devastate their economy for a generation.