As the deeply unpopular Brussels-based European Union continues to usurp unprecedented powers over citizens and formerly sovereign national governments, another example of the EU gone wild just hit the headlines. Under its latest controversial scheming, supposedly aimed at improving “road safety,” all civilian cars within the 28-member state bloc could be fitted with a device to prevent speeding — essentially preventing any speed in excess of 70 miles per hour.

Global outrage is mounting after an armed squad of German police and social workers abducted four homeschooled children from their loving parents’ arms, relying on a Nazi-era prohibition on home education that has been used to ruthlessly terrorize embattled homeschooling families in Germany for years. The latest move, which experts in international law have condemned as a “shocking” violation of fundamental human rights, follows controversial efforts by the Obama administration to deport another persecuted German home-educating family granted asylum in the United States by a federal judge in 2010. Hundreds of other families have fled persecution in Germany to other European nations, virtually all of which permit homeschooling.  

Challengers to German Chancellor Angela Merkel are accusing her of permitting the NSA to conduct illegal surveillance on the people of Germany.

 

The Guardian newspaper (U.K.) and other news outlets reported on July 12 that during a meeting with human rights activists at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden said he will request temporary political asylum in Russia. Tanya Lokshina of Human Rights Watch, who was at the meeting, reported that Snowden would stay in Russia until he could win safe passage to Latin America.

The comparison of the NSA to the East German STASI reflects the same problem of the surveillance state: Just who is sorting through the large amounts of data?