OASThe UN General Assembly on June 30 adopted a resolution by acclamation — sponsored by Bolivia, Venezuela, Mexico, and the United States, among other UN members — condemning the coup "that has interrupted the democratic and constitutional order and the legitimate exercise of power in Honduras, and resulted in the removal of the democratically elected president," Jose Manuel Zelaya Rosales.

The world's leftists — ranging from internationalists, to Marxists, to confirmed communist Fidel Castro — ostracized the new Honduran government of Roberto Micheletti installed by the nation's congress on June 28. 

Zelaya and Michelleti Acting on the orders of the Honduran Supreme Court, on June 28 a military force detained the nation's president, Manuel Zelaya, and took him to an air force base, where he was taken by plane into exile in San Jose, Costa Rica.

Zelaya (Hondurus)The 47-year-old suspension of Cuba from the Organization of American States was lifted last week during a meeting of the hemispheric organization in Honduras. But it doesn’t look like Cuba is interested in re-joining.

Mexican Violence, gun controlsOn the CBS television show Face the Nation on April 12, in an interview with Bob Schieffer, Mexico’s Ambassador to the United States Arturo Sarukhan tried to blame much of the violence in his country on the allegedly lax gun-control laws in the United States. He maintained in part: “Ninety percent of all weapons we are seizing in Mexico, Bob, are coming from across the United States.” Reinstituting the so-called assault-weapons ban in the United States, which expired in 2004, said the ambassador, “could have a profound impact on the number and the caliber of weapons going down to Mexico.”

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