The Education Minister of Ontario, Canada, — a professing Catholic who sends her children to Catholic schools — declared October 10 that the province’s publicly funded Catholic schools may not teach students that abortion is wrong because such teaching amounts to “misogyny,” which is prohibited in schools under a controversial anti-bullying law.

“Taking away a woman’s right to choose could arguably be considered one of the most misogynistic actions that one could take,” Laurel Broten said during a press conference.

“Bill 13,” she asserted, “is about tackling misogyny.”

In an address to the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), Mexican President Felipe Calderón recommends government-enforced redistribution of wealth as the key to preventing the global economic crisis from “becoming a major catastrophe.”

During an interview conducted on September 24 by Carla A. Hills, the co-chairman of the CFR’s board of directors,  Calderón reported that acceptance of this central plank of the socialist economic platform helped his nation successfully avoid an absolute financial crash.

The Canadian Medical Association, the largest association of doctors in Canada, has redefined human life. On August 15, the CMA passed a resolution supporting the notion that a child is not a human being until he is in a living state outside the body of the mother.

While Americans are embroiled in discussions of the various implications of this year’s presidential contest, very few of them are weighing the significance of a presidential election that will take place tomorrow just across the southern border of these United States. The candidates of three major parties are vying for the presidency of Mexico, and no matter which candidate wins, he — or she — will face the task of rebuilding a nation devastated by years of war and economic crisis.

Conditions in Mexico continue to demonstrate that almost no form of violent criminal activity is impossible in that failed state. Although the violent conflict between the Mexican government and the drug cartels has continued unabated, it has become increasingly rare for the American media to report on the conflict. The Mexican "drug war" began with President Felipe Calderon’s declaration of war in December 2006. But as that so-called war continues to drag on, the hopes which were expressed nearly six years ago for a quick victory have proven to be ephemeral.