Amid an imploding economy, runaway inflation, shortages of basic goods, electricity blackouts, surging violence, and widespread accusations of voter fraud in Venezuela, socialist strongman Hugo Chávez allegedly won a narrow victory in Sunday’s presidential election, according to the nation’s National Electoral Council (CNE). Though the Venezuelan regime has a ban on publishing the results of exit polls, a widely cited survey conducted by the consulting firm Varianza showed opposition candidate Henrique Capriles ahead by a slim margin as the vote was coming to an end.   

News reports and accounts from witnesses in Venezuela indicated that Chávez had ordered tanks and over 100,000 AK-47-wielding troops into the streets as fears about potential violence grew – the despotic self-styled socialist revolutionary had previously warned of civil war if he lost the election. On Twitter, meanwhile, angry Venezuelans accused Chávez of blatant voter fraud and threatened to leave the country.

After Google’s unit in Brazil refused to take down a YouTube video attacking a candidate in local elections, federal police took the search-engine giant’s Brazilian chief into custody for questioning. Apparently Google had been ordered by a court to remove the clip in question based on a decades-old law purporting to prohibit attacks that "offend the dignity or decorum" of political candidates.

Argentina's government is growing more desperate as her currency is once again caught in an inflationary maelstrom. Are draconian financial and currency controls in America's future?

The recent illegal ouster of Paraguay from Mercosur and the incorporation of Hugo Chavez's Venezuelan regime into the trade group is the latest in an ongoing and  alarming string of victories throughout the hemisphere by the communist-socialist alliance known as the São Paulo Forum.

When former Paraguayan President Fernando Lugo Méndez was lawfully impeached by united lawmakers in late June, Latin America’s powerful socialist leaders denounced the move against their comrade as a “coup” against “democracy.” Despite the fact that the impeachment by a democratically elected Congress followed constitutional procedures and was endorsed by the nation’s Supreme Court, the outcry against the ouster and Paraguay’s new leader is still growing.

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