The Bible says, “Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to one another without grumbling” (1 Peter 4:8-9). Every day, people across the world prove to live the teachings of the Bible, particularly at times of greatest sorrow and strife. The Japanese earthquake and tsunami is no exception, as men, women, and even animals emerged as heroes and givers of love.

A poll of public opinion in five nations of the European Union reveals a high level of distrust of government to solve the problems confronting them today. If the findings of the poll are accurate, a majority of Europeans in some of the largest and most influential nations of the EU believe that their governments are, in fact, part of the problem.

An attack by militant Muslims which has thus far destroyed at least a dozen churches may signal an expansion in anti-Christian violence in Ethiopia as the next front in the recent escalation of the Jihad’s war against Christianity.

Japan’s tsunami, triggered by an 8.9 magnitude earthquake — one of the world's five most powerful in recorded history — is projected to leave tens of thousands dead in its wake. Two thousand bodies have already been uncovered on the shores of Miyagi prefecture, an area that suffered the majority of the damage.

Owing to Japan's nuclear power ordeal, the inevitable debate over nuclear power and its impact on the environment and human health is beginning to stir once again. Japan’s 9.0 magnitude earthquake and its resulting tsunami last Friday shattered the northeast section of the country, and its after-effects have devastated the infrastructure and surrounding landscape. The Fukushima Daiichi plant was designed for a  8.2 magnitude earthquake, which was the worst-expected earthquake for a 500-year time frame. Because the Richter scale is logarithmic, the quake that rocked the Fukushima nuclear power plant was actually more than six times its design withstandability.