Omar SuleimanAs expected, Egypt’s Vice President Omar Suleiman met with opposition leaders on Sunday for the first time and agreed to a number of concessions, including the release of those taken into custody since the start of the anti-government protests and the lifting of the country’s emergency laws, which were imposed by Mubarak in 1981 and have been enforced ever since.

As the world focuses its attention on the events transpiring in Tunisia and Egypt, the flames of revolution continue to sweep through the Middle East — particularly in Yemen, where radical Islamist and socialist forces have come together to topple yet another pro-Western state.

A Pakistani lawmaker who had worked to reform her nation’s harsh blasphemy law has abandoned that effort, at least for the moment. Sherry Rehman, a member of Pakistan’s parliament, had authored a bill for the National Assembly that would have removed the death sentence as a form of punishment for blasphemy against Mohammed.

Cuban flagThe good news: The President has kept his promises to cut the number of government employees drastically and to reduce regulations so that new small businesses can open up, leading to an almost immediate 50 percent increase in the number of self-employed persons. The bad news: That’s President Raul Castro of communist Cuba, not President Barack Obama of ostensibly capitalist America.

While President Obama and his administration continue to celebrate Islam as the religion of peace and laud “the contribution of Muslims to the United States” as “interwoven into the fabric of our communities and our country,” some European leaders appear to be prepared to resist the bland conventions of political correctness and actually identify the victims of the persecution which Islam is unleashing throughout the Muslim nations of the world.