The massacre at the Church of Our Lady of Deliverance in Baghdad is the latest example of the horrific suffering Christians have endured in a nation shattered by war. As reported for The New American on October 29, Iraqi Christians have suffered persecution since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003; any "victory" which U.S. leaders trumpet in that nation has not been enjoyed by the hundreds of thousands of Christians who have now fled their homeland. For many, the persecution carried out by Islamic militants has made emigration a necessity.

A suspicious package was discovered at the office of German Chancellor Angela Merkel Tuesday morning, just hours after small mail bombs exploded outside the German and Swiss embassies in Athens, attacks which have been blamed on left-wing domestic terrorists. Additionally, three more questionable packages were destroyed in Athens by Greek police.

The madness of the courts and the greed of trial lawyers are proverbial. The woman who won a huge award from McDonald’s when she spilled hot coffee on her lap has become, perhaps, the archetypical example of litigation run wild. Now McDonald’s again finds itself making headlines in a lawsuit over conduct that seems safe and ordinary to most of us.

A report from the AP on October 29 cited a statement from an official at the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Seoul, South Korea, saying that North Koreans had fired two rounds toward South Korea along the border and South Korean troops immediately fired back.

Over seven years have passed since President Bush declared victory in Iraq, and two months have now gone by since Obama declared that same conflict to be over, but for Christians in the Middle East, such talk of victory is hollow. For centuries, Christians living under Muslim domination have endured cycles of persecution and tolerance, but now an virtually unprecedented exodus of Christians from the region is underway.

Log in