Somali thugs have hijacked the yacht of a couple who were in the middle of a sea voyage to take Bibles to other countries. As reported by the Associated Press, the yacht, called the Quest (photo, left), was taken on February 18, “two days after a Somali pirate was sentenced to 33 years in prison by a New York court for the 2009 hijacking of the Maersk Alabama.” That hijacking came to an abrupt end when Navy snipers killed two pirates holding the ship’s captain.

The inflammatory British Muslim leader who has called for Sharia law in Britain will lead a march for the same goal at the White House on March 3, he says.

London’s Daily Mail reports that Anjem Choudary (left), who heads the Islamic supremacist movement called Islam4UK, is coming to the United States to preach because “Americans are the biggest criminals in the world today.” Two other Islamic firebrands, Abu Izzadeen and Sayful Islam, will join him.

As country after country attempts to recreate the historic events in Tunisia and Egypt, most of the world's and media’s attention has been focused on the Middle East. Cable news reports often depict a map of the region with the countries in turmoil highlighted: Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Sudan, Jordan, Syria, Iraq, Iran, and Yemen. But no matter what cable news station one watches, one country — in the midst of turmoil and anti-government protests — remains unhighlighted and unmentioned on those maps: Albania.

Emboldened by the fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, a key ally of the United States, other pro-American regimes in the region are quickly coming to realize that their countries are not immune to the revolutionary fervor that has swept through the Middle East. In Bahrain, protests to topple the monarchy continue today, as protesters mourn the deaths of five fellow demonstrators killed the day before in a violent clash with the kingdom’s military.

Communist China supplies the world with more than 95 percent of the rare earth minerals, resources which are increasingly vital to advanced technology. In September 2009, China announced that it would reduce its production of these minerals to 35,000 tons, with the stated reason being to conserve scare resources and to protect the environment. In July 2010, China reduced the quota of rare earth minerals for export by 72 percent. In September 2010, the communist government halted shipments of critical rare earth minerals to Japan and the next month also halted shipments to the United States and Europe.