GadhafiIs Libya one quagmire too far? The United Nations Security Council's passage of a  resolution on March 17 imposing a no-fly zone over Libya is forcing us to confront that burning question. As I write, President Obama has already committed U.S. naval and air assets to "playing a supportive role" to what is, ostensibly, a European-led military initiative. In a meeting at the White House before his public announcement of support for the UN actions, President Obama assured congressional leaders that our participation in the no-fly enforcement would not lead to the deployment of American troops on the ground in Libya.

The Bible says, “Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to one another without grumbling” (1 Peter 4:8-9). Every day, people across the world prove to live the teachings of the Bible, particularly at times of greatest sorrow and strife. The Japanese earthquake and tsunami is no exception, as men, women, and even animals emerged as heroes and givers of love.

A poll of public opinion in five nations of the European Union reveals a high level of distrust of government to solve the problems confronting them today. If the findings of the poll are accurate, a majority of Europeans in some of the largest and most influential nations of the EU believe that their governments are, in fact, part of the problem.

An attack by militant Muslims which has thus far destroyed at least a dozen churches may signal an expansion in anti-Christian violence in Ethiopia as the next front in the recent escalation of the Jihad’s war against Christianity.

Japan’s tsunami, triggered by an 8.9 magnitude earthquake — one of the world's five most powerful in recorded history — is projected to leave tens of thousands dead in its wake. Two thousand bodies have already been uncovered on the shores of Miyagi prefecture, an area that suffered the majority of the damage.