German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy both believe in global "solutions" to problems. How well does this play in Lisbon, Athens, Dublin, or Madrid? Portugal, Greece, Ireland, and Spain have had more than enough external pressures on their peoples in the last century.

“We want blood for blood.” Those were the last words of Shumaila Faheem, who committed suicide after swallowing poison pills on Sunday, February 6 as a protest affirming her belief that she would never receive justice for her husband's killing from the present regime.

Physical torture, abuse, forced abductions, sexual harassment, forced marriages, and other brutal practices are everyday events in the Islamic republic of Pakistan. Women in Pakistan still face daunting hardships in the male-dominated society. Although seemingly every other day the government announces plans to secure the rights of women — it has been of no use. Torture incidents are still the highlight of the media on a regular basis.

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel commented that Islam was just as much a part of Germany as Christianity and Judaism, she was wrong, apparently. Until it got caught, the European Union planned to distribute more than 3 million school calendars that included dates for the celebration of Muslim and Jewish holidays, but omitted Christian feasts. So for the EU, Islam was more a part of Germany and Europe than Christianity.

While Islamist extremism is advancing in Pakistan and Egypt, one of the bastions of the Jihadist ideology is facing a challenge its mullahs are having a hard time countering: the Christian Church is growing in Iran.