While many American and European politicians have responded to the Jihad currently being waged against the West either by denying its Islamic character, or by seeking to engage in endless wars against the Jihad around the globe, Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders (left) is striving for the freedom of Europeans to live in their own countries without the fear of sharia law being imposed on them. Wilders’ reward for his efforts has been a charges of "bigotry" and criminal prosecution.

Following a decade-long trial, an international court sentenced Rwandan Maj. Gen. Augustin Bizimungu (left) to 30 years in prison for his alleged role in the 1994 genocide that left more than 500,000 ethnic Tutsis dead. Two other former military officers received 20-year sentences each.  

Now that America’s decade-long hunt for Osama bin Laden is over, al-Qaeda’s hunt to replace him is just beginning. 

Several names have been suggested as competitors for the helm of al-Qaeda. The problem faced by all of them, however, is inherent in the structure of the organization itself. As described by al-Qaeda insider Khalid al-Hammadi, al-Qaeda’s modus operandi is “centralization of decision and decentralization of execution.” This purposeful fracturing of command and control infrastructure makes consolidation of power very difficult.

Apart from the extreme height of the walls and the barbed wire with which they were topped, there was nothing particularly distinctive about the compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where Osama bin Laden was reported to have lived and died.

Using the strange excuse of compromising terror investigations, London's metro police refuse to release a list of informants in the unsolved case of Jack the Ripper. The Ripper murders occurred in 1888 in Whitechapel, a run-down section of London now populated mostly by Bengalis.