World News

AP reported statements from NATO leaders on June 11 declaring that the alliance had “regained the initiative” in the Afghan war, along with promises that the gains could result in a handover of security responsibilities to Afghan authorities by the end of 2010.

The New York Times — the newspaper whose reporter Walter Duranty won a Pulitzer Prize in 1932 while deliberately covering up Joseph Stalin’s starvation of the Ukrainian people — has apparently changed its tune on the subject of communism in the decades since.

After rattling markets last week with fears of a default, the Hungarian government announced a series of measures earlier this week including spending cuts, tax-policy changes, and a new tax on the financial sector aimed at satisfying international institutions and containing the nation’s public deficit.

In 2005 the U.S. Supreme Court, in the case of Kelo v. City of New London, ruled that governments in the United States have the right to steal their citizens’ property and transfer it to private developers as long as it serves a “public purpose,” namely bringing in more tax revenue. Thus, according to the court, the city of New London, Connecticut, was within its rights to evict Susette Kelo and others from their property in order to hand the property over to Pfizer for development — development that, in fact, never materialized.

Bilderberg GroupIn hindsight, the Steering Committee in charge of the annual gathering of elites known informally as the Bilderberg group could have chosen a better — or at least a safer — venue for this year’s gathering than Sitges, Spain. The stunning Mediterranean resort near Barcelona, known far and wide as Spain’s most decadent locale (think San Francisco’s Castro district, New Orleans’ Bourbon Street, and Palm Beach all rolled into one), just happens to be near one of several Ground Zeroes of the European economic meltdown — Madrid. (Another Ground Zero, of course, is Athens, near where the “Bilderbergers” convened last summer.)

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