The Netherlands has long been a welcome home to Jews who suffered persecution elsewhere in Europe. During the Holocaust, Dutch Christians were exemplary in their effects to rescue Jews, often risking their own lives. During the 1973 energy crisis, the Dutch were conspicuous in not yielding to boycott pressure, riding their bikes instead of using automobiles. The Dutch, who in the Dutch East Indies held one of the most populous Muslim lands on earth, have equally been solicitous toward the sensibilities of Muslims. In fact, many would say that Holland has been far too interested in yielding to Islamic pressures.

Carter HamThe General in charge of the U.S. African Command, Army General Carter Ham, told congressional leaders in a closed meeting April 5 that the military is considering sending ground troops into Libya. "I suspect there might be some consideration of that," Ham told members of the House Armed Services Committee. "My personal view at this point would be that that's probably not the ideal circumstance, again for the regional reaction that having American boots on the ground would entail."

A former imam who converted to Christianity is facing extradition from Sweden to his native Iraq, where he may face imprisonment or death for his "apostasy" from Islam. According to an article at Dagen.se (translated by Google):

There are countervailing pressures in any nation: power and profit. Power that comes from conflict and agitation — power for the sake of power — and profit that comes from being hospitable to individuals seeking to maximize their own talents and efforts. All too often, pundits laud the first aspect of statehood and mock the second. 

Anjem Choudary, the British Muslim imam who advocates Sharia law for Britain and calls British soldiers murderers, says the royal wedding in London April 29 is a likely target for a terrorist attack.