There are countervailing pressures in any nation: power and profit. Power that comes from conflict and agitation — power for the sake of power — and profit that comes from being hospitable to individuals seeking to maximize their own talents and efforts. All too often, pundits laud the first aspect of statehood and mock the second. 

Anjem Choudary, the British Muslim imam who advocates Sharia law for Britain and calls British soldiers murderers, says the royal wedding in London April 29 is a likely target for a terrorist attack.

Backed by French and United Nations military forces, and approved by President Barack Obama, Muslim militias loyal to opposition leader Alassane Ouattara are on a rampage in the Ivory Coast that, according to news reports and officials, has left over a thousand Christians dead so far in an effort to oust current President Laurent Gbagbo.

David Cameron, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, told university students in Islamabad, Pakistan, that the “time is now ripe” for India and Pakistan to make real peace.

The European Union announced that national governments may not provide tax-exempt status to charities and non-profit organizations, prompting a backlash from some national governments which vowed to battle the ruling.