The ongoing assault on the Christian churches of Egypt in the aftermath of that nation’s "democratic" revolution continues to demonstrate that the rising leadership has a very different vision for a post-Mubarak nation than that which was presented to the West earlier this year.

It didn’t make a huge news splash, but on June 17 the United Nations scored a first of sorts when its so-called "Human Rights" Council went to bat for oppressed homosexuals the world over, passing a resolution “seeking a study to document discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender persons,” reported UPI News.

Geert Wilders (left), member of the Dutch Parliament's Party of Freedom who was criminally prosecuted for speaking out about the Islamic immigration and integration problem in the Netherlands, has been acquitted of "hate speech" crimes. During a public debate about Muslim integration and multiculturalism, Wilders had declared, “The core problem is the fascist Islam, the sick ideology of Allah and Mohammed as laid down in the Islamic Mein Kampf, the Quran.” The presiding judge found that his remarks were “at the edge of what’s legally permissible,” "hurtful," "offensive," and of an “inciting character.” But the court declared that, given the context of his comments, his speech did not constitute a criminal act.

After witnessing the massive economic crisis swamping the European Union and euro-zone countries in particular, the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR or UNASUL) has slowed plans to create its own continental central bank and regional currency.

Should people of faith be allowed to practice their beliefs without the interference of government?  Christians in America have been wondering about that for several decades now. When a crèche cannot be shown in the public park, while a menorah can and when a voluntary school prayer before a football game is outlawed by federal judges, then Christians have to wonder just how far their right of faith extends.

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