If you question the government narrative about terror attacks like the one that occurred on September 11, or believe in religious prophecies about the end times, or dispute the legitimacy of your rulers, or hold any sort of views that politicians consider “extremist,” watch out. Last week, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron told the United Nations and its largely autocratic member regimes that the perpetual terror war requires far more than just crackdowns on violence and terrorism. Now, as the terror war becomes increasingly globalized and fanatical, what Cameron described as “non-violent extremism” all over the world is in the crosshairs, too.

Glamour, beauty, fame, wealth, privilege, power. Gulnara Karimova had it all. As daughter to Uzbekistan’s dictator Islam Karimov, she seemed untouchable.

Even as the military arm of the United Nations struggles with scandals and atrocities perpetrated by its infamous “blue helmet” troops, the Obama administration joined forces with the UN and dozens of its member governments and dictatorships in pledging to strengthen the global body’s so-called “peacekeeping” machinations. The controversial planetary war-making forces, which have come under strong criticism for raping and slaughtering civilians amid various UN missions around the world, received strong backing to expand on a wide range of fronts. The Obama administration also emphasized again that it hopes to extract vastly more funds from U.S. taxpayers to support the UN’s “peace” enforcement worldwide.

In yet another example of Islam's influence in the West, a U.K. KFC refused to give a native Englishman a hand wipe, claiming that the alcohol it contained could offend Muslims.

Chinese officials have used the editorial pages of the People’s Daily, the flagship paper of China’s Communist Party, to warn protesters engaged in anti-Mainland China demonstrations to back off. The ranks of demonstrators have been swelled by thousands of University of Hong Kong students who have been boycotting classes to take part in the protests seeking expanded voting rights, less interference from Beijing, and the preservation of freedom of the press, which exists to a greater degree in Hong Kong than on the mainland.