Somali piratesThe resistance put up by the American crew of the Maersk Alabama and the dramatic Easter Sunday rescue of Captain Richard Phillips, of Underhill, Vermont, who had been held by Somali pirates since April 8, may cause pirates to think twice about targeting Americans. But some Somali pirates are threatening retaliation for the U.S. military action that resulted in three pirates being killed and one taken captive.

Felipe CalderonA familiar accusation leveled at U.S. government officials came from a surprising source: Mexican President Felipe Calderon. “It is impossible to pass tons of drugs or cocaine to U.S. without some grade of complicity of some American authorities,” he said in a March 30 interview with the BBC before leaving for an official visit to London. “We need to act on both sides of the border.”

MaerskSooner or later it was bound to happen. Over the past several years, American ships and crews had evaded the rising tide of piracy in the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea. But on April 8, pirates off the coast of Somalia seized a U.S.-flagged container ship, the Maersk Alabama, with a crew of 20 Americans. However, the American seamen were unwilling to join the crews of 18 other ships who are being held for ransom by the Somali pirates. In what is believed to be an unprecedented action in the Somali pirates’ sphere of operations, the unarmed crew fought back and overpowered their attackers.

Ex-prime minister Tony Blair is seen as the front-runner for a permanent EU presidency post, when and if the job is actually implemented. The post of President of the European Council is held for six months on a rotating basis by various heads of member states. Currently the Czech Republic holds the seat, with Mirek Topolanek as president of the council and Vaclav Klaus as president-in-office. The president-in-office is a rather insignificant unofficial position.

North Korean missilesAs expected, North Korea launched its Taepodong-2 long-range rocket on April 5, a move President Obama called "provocative" and "clear violation" of a United Nations Security Council resolution. While the ostensible purpose of the launch, according to official North Korean statements, was to launch a communications satellite, officials from South Korea, Japan, and the United States have all said that the launch was — in actuality — a test of the missile, itself. The three nations stated in advance of the launch that they wanted to level sanctions against North Korea if it proceeded. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on March 31: "Their missile launch violates UN Security Council Resolution 1718 and there will be consequences, certainly (at) the UN Security Council if they proceed with the launch."

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