In honor of United Nations Day and the 70th anniversary of the UN's founding, more than 200 iconic monuments and buildings around the world will be lit up in the color “UN blue,” the controversial global organization announced this week. Among the famous sites set to turn blue on October 24 to honor the UN are Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, the Empire State Building in New York, the Great Pyramids at Giza in Egypt, Sydney's Opera House, Westminster Hall in the United Kingdom, the Great Wall of China, and hundreds of other globally recognized landmarks across more than 60 nations. The theme of the festivities, UN officials said, is the notion that a “strong UN” will somehow produce a “better world.”

Canadians went to the polls yesterday, and resoundingly rejected the comparatively conservative government of Stephen Harper, electing a majority of Liberals and a new prime minister with a familiar last name.

 

Dr. Mudar Zahran, a Palestinian academic and a leader of Jordan’s opposition, warns that the Muslims entering Europe won't integrate and are part of “the soft Islamic conquest of the West.”

The recent president of the United Nations General Assembly, a key player in designing everything from the UN Sustainable Development Goals to a sought-after UN “climate” regime, was arrested last week on corruption charges in the United States. According to U.S. prosecutors, former UN General Assembly President John Ashe (shown second from right), a globalist bureaucrat from Antigua and Barbuda, took millions in bribes from a Chinese businessman with deep ties to the brutal communist regime — he has also been a major financier of the U.S. Democrat Party and the Clinton machine. In exchange for the bribes, then-UN leader Ashe helped the Chinese operative advance his agenda with the UN and the corrupt government of his Caribbean homeland.

After the pro-transparency group WikiLeaks released the intellectual property chapter of the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) “trade” regime, the outcry around the world and across the political spectrum was swift and brutal. Among the many problems highlighted by critics of the scheme: the assault on national sovereignty and self-government; the threat to free expression, privacy, whistleblowers, and freedom of information; the generous handouts to Big Business cronies in everything from pharmaceuticals to Hollywood; conscripting Internet Service Providers (ISPs) into serving as agents of the transnational TPP regime; and much more.