The bankrupt Socialist rulers of France are under attack by the monster they helped create and empower. This week, French officials are facing off against European Union finance bosses over a bloated national government budget — EU bosses say the numbers must be slashed before they can be “approved” by Brussels, but French politicians are refusing. Without a resolution to the conflict, the European Commission — a sort of hybrid legislative and executive branch run largely by armies of unaccountable bureaucrats — might overrule Paris and reject its proposed spending spree for next year.

The global-government-promoting Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) published a new report this month demanding further integration of North America, calling for deeper “cooperation” on everything from energy, law enforcement, and healthcare to labor regulations, trade, and education. With the globalist architects well aware of how unpopular their sought-after “North American Union” scheme remains among the public, the CFR appears to have toned down its extreme anti-sovereignty rhetoric. Instead, the new report emphasizes what the outfit called a “new focus” on North America dealing primarily with energy, community, and security. The scheme, however, remains just as radical.

A study review by a World Health Organization drug advisor concludes that smoking marijuana may amount to playing Russian roulette with your mental health.

Communist China slams bipartisan U.S. congressional commission for “interfering in China’s internal affairs.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the Obama administration and the United Nations send military troops and massive amounts of resources in a thus far totally ineffective bid to supposedly combat the deadly Ebola virus, one private company has already “stopped Ebola in its tracks” with exactly zero soldiers, according to National Public Radio. Indeed, using standard medical techniques to control the disease it found through Google searches, Firestone Natural Rubber Company, which operates a giant rubber-tree farm in Ebola-stricken Liberia, has become what the Wall Street Journal described as a “sanctuary of health in a country where cases are doubling every three weeks.”