Vilius BrazenasVilius Brazenas, a native Lithuanian, was on the frontlines of the freedom fight for the span of several generations and resisted both Nazi and Communist oppression of his homeland. This Interview of Brazenas by William F. Jasper originally appeared in The New American on August 14, 2000. It is being reprinted in tribute to his recent passing on October 3, at the age of 97.

Tim HawkinsIn this era of potty-mouthed comedians, good clean humor that isn’t cloying is hard to come by. The Red Skeltons and Victor Borges of yesterday would have trouble getting a laugh from today’s jaded audiences, who expect the unexpected, edgy, and outré from their funnymen. Most of us who enjoy a good laugh have gotten used to tolerating “a little” profanity or inappropriate subject matter from our comedians, as long as the coarser material is bleeped out (see: Jon Stewart’s “The Daily Show”).

Like most conservatives, Joseph Sobran, enjoyed being a contrarian, flatly contradicting the conventional wisdom, which he liked to describe as "what everybody thinks everybody else thinks." Joe Sobran wasn't "everybody" and he was only too happy to challenge, in his own special way, many of the things that "everybody knows." Things like "You can't turn back the clock."

A more elegant wielder of the pen than Joe Sobran was always hard to find. After devouring something he had written, most of his readers would summarize, “How nicely that was phrased,” or “I wish I could write like that.”

Today is an important day for New Hampshire Catholics. It is the 75th birthday of Bishop of Manchester John B. McCormack, the former assistant to Bernard Cardinal "I fought the" Law in Boston. Bishop McCormack must, therefore, submit his notice of retirement to His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI, and for many in the church, that is added reason to sing: "This is the day the Lord has made/ Let us rejoice and be glad in it."

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