Is technology and industry good or bad? There is no moral answer to the question. Certainly there are happy men and women who worked in old trades exchanging the material benefits of technology for the comfort and emotional satisfaction of keeping alive old ways of work. The delightful town of Williamsburg in Virginia or the equally happy Silver Dollar City in the Ozarks are filled with folks whose joy is preserving the making of horseshoes, candles, rock candy, and many other products whose manufacture is a part of our history.

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wants to get the federal government more involved in schools. The federal government "will do all we can" to bolster technological expansion in the classroom, Duncan recently stated, because technology "can even the playing field" for minority and low-income students who don’t have the benefit of owning laptops and iPhones.

As more and more young people graduate from college with mounds of unresolved loan debt, financial experts and bankruptcy attorneys are calling the progressively worsening dilemma the "next debt bomb." According to a new survey conducted by the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys (NACBA), 81 percent of bankruptcy lawyers report that the number of prospective clients with student loan debt has increased "significantly" or "somewhat" in the past few years.

Students at Boston’s Northeastern University have succeeded in blocking fast-food chain Chick-fil-A from opening a franchise on the school’s campus, following complaints that the company financially supports organizations that have an “anti-gay” bias.

A North Carolina county has thumbed its nose at the state’s ACLU franchise, which has been warning county officials all over the state to stop opening government meetings with prayer. As reported by the Associated Press, a “Rowan County commissioner opened the board’s [March 5] meeting with a Christian prayer, despite a warning from the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union that it would violate the law and potentially trigger a lawsuit. As has long been the elected board’s practice, Commissioner Jon Barber (left) opened the public meeting with an invocation asking for a blessing in the name of Jesus.”

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