DollarsThe plan, according to our government’s economic gurus, was to stimulate our economy by sending tax rebates to U.S. taxpayers to spur spending and invigorate our troubled economy.

From Nouakchott in northwest Africa to Port-au-Prince in the Caribbean, the situation is becoming grimmer by the day. The specter of world hunger, unseen in generations, even in the world’s poorest nations, is once again raising its head as food prices spiral out of control, leaving hoarding, rioting, and shortages in their wake.

Although tax season has come and gone once again, the various proposals for tax reform are still with us. These tax-reform plans, even though they appear outwardly to be quite different, have one thing in common that dooms them from being taken seriously by advocates of liberty and less government: they are all revenue-neutral plans seeking the most fair and efficient way to fund the federal government’s ever-increasing, multi-trillion-dollar budgets.

MoneyAt a conference on April 16, Richard Fisher, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, warned that the U.S. economy could be facing trouble in the future. “According to official government reports,” cautioned Fisher, when it comes to wealth transfer programs including Social Security and Medicare “the gap between what we will take in and what we have promised to pay … now stands at $83.9 trillion.”

Congressional approval of the latest round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade was a victory for international socialism and a defeat of the principles of America's Founding Fathers.

Affiliates and Friends

Social Media