Name: George Allen


Senate: Virginia, Republican


Cumulative Freedom Index Score: 54%


Status: Former Member of the Senate

Score Breakdown:
50% (109th Congress: 2005-2006); 56% (108th Congress: 2003-2004); 55% (107th Congress: 2001-2002)

Key Votes:





*** Prior to 2008, "The Freedom Index" was known as the "The Conservative Index." ***





On Passage of the Bill H.R. 6061: A bill to establish operational control over the international land and maritime borders of the United States.
Vote Date: September 29, 2006Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Border Fence. In the final hours because adjourning for their October recess, the Senate passed a Border Fencing bill (H.R. 6061) that would authorize the construction of nearly 700 miles of security fencing along the U.S.-Mexican border. The border fence is just the first of a series of border security initiatives that House Republicans intend to merge into the Homeland Security spending bill. If implemented, the 700 miles of fencing along the border would be a good first step toward protecting our borders from the massive influx of illegal immigration facing our country today.

The Senate passed H.R. 6061 by a wide margin of 80-19 on September 29, 2006 (Roll Call 262). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because such a border fence would help prevent illegal immigration and further protect our borders.



On Passage of the Bill S. 3930: A bill to authorize trial by military commission for violations of the law of war, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 28, 2006Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Military Tribunals. This bill (S. 3930) would authorize a new system of military tribunals to try persons designated "unlawful enemy combatants" by the president. The bill defines an unlawful enemy combatant to include a person who "has purposely and materially supported hostilities against the United States or its co-belligerents." Once designated an unlawful enemy combatant, a defendant's rights would be curtailed: he would be denied the right of habeas corpus; he could be detained indefinitely; and evidence obtained through coercion could be used against him -- so long as the coercion falls outside the administration's definition of torture.

Critics of the tribunals bill are planning to file suit in order to test the constitutionality of the legislation. This legislation was in response to the U.S. Supreme Court's June 29 ruling on the case of Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, which declared that the administration's current system for trying military detainees was unconstitutional.

The Senate passed S. 3930 by a vote of 65-34 on September 28, 2006 (Roll Call 259). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the bill would curtail defendant rights.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 5684: A bill to implement the United States-Oman Free Trade Agreement.
Vote Date: September 19, 2006Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Oman Trade Agreement. The Oman Free Trade Agreement (H.R. 5684) would reduce most tariffs and duties between Oman and the United States. H.R. 5684 was considered under fast-track authority, which requires Congress to expedite consideration of presidentially negotiated trade pacts without offering amendments.

The Oman agreement is just one stepping-stone in the White House's effort to form a Middle Eastern Free Trade Area (MEFTA) by 2013. These so-called free-trade agreements have historically failed because they encourage the relocation of U.S. jobs to foreign countries so that the companies can get cheap labor. Meanwhile, they don't provide the United States with trade benefits -- largely because the people in those countries cannot afford to buy our products -- thereby harming the U.S. economy. The agreements also put our economic destiny in the hands of unelected foreign bureaucrats, such as those at the World Trade Organization.

The Senate passed H.R. 5684 on September 19, 2006 by a vote of 62-32 (Roll Call 250). We have assigned pluses to the nays because such trade agreements damage the U.S. economy and threaten U.S. sovereignty by the imposition of international regulations.



On Passage of the Bill S. 3711: A bill to enhance the energy independence and security of the United States by providing for exploration, development, and production activities for mineral resources in the Gulf of Mexico, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: August 1, 2006Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Offshore Drilling. Sen. Pete Domenici (R-N.M.) sponsored a bill (S. 3711) that would authorize oil drilling in the 8.3 million acres of the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Senate would allow much less offshore drilling than the House-passed legislation (see House bill below); however, it would still be a step in the right direction.

[ H.R. 4761 would end the federal moratorium on most offshore oil and gas drilling. It would continue the ban within 50 miles of shore, while allowing the states the option of extending that ban out to 100 miles. It would also allow states to share in the drilling proceeds. ]

The Senate passed S. 3711 on August 1, 2006 by a vote of 71-25. (Roll Call 219). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because the United States should reduce its dependency on foreign oil and utilize it own energy resources.



On Passage of the Bill S. 403: A bill to amend title 18, United States Code, to prohibit taking minors across State lines in circumvention of laws requiring the involvement of parents in abortion decisions.
Vote Date: July 25, 2006Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Parental Notification. The Child Custody Protection Act (S. 403) would make it a federal crime for a person to transport a minor across state lines for an abortion in order to bypass state laws requiring parental notification.

The Senate passed S. 403 by a vote of 65-34 on July 25, 2006 (Roll Call 216). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because Congress can and should use its power to regulate interstate commerce to restrict abortion.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 810: A bill to amend the Public Health Service Act to provide for human embryonic stem cell research.
Vote Date: July 18, 2006Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Stem-cell Research. The embryonic stem-cell research bill (H.R. 810) would allow federal funds to be used for research on embryonic stem-cell lines derived from surplus embryos at in vitro fertilization clinics. Such research would be done only by cannibalizing and destroying human embryos. Proponents contend that the research is needed to combat various diseases, but stem cells derived from sources other than embryos may be used to achieve the same results.

The Senate passed H.R. 810 by a vote of 63-37 on July 18, 2006 (Roll Call 206). It prompted President Bush to use his veto power for the first time in his presidency. We have assigned pluses to the nays because such research would violate the right to life for millions of unborn children.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA Re: Dodd Amdt. No. 4641): To fund urgent priorities for our Nation's firefighters, law enforcement personnel, emergency medical personnel, and all Americans by reducing the tax breaks for individuals with annual incomes in excess of $1,000,000.
Vote Date: July 13, 2006Vote: NAYGood Vote.
First Responder Grants. During consideration for the Homeland Security Appropriations bill (H.R. 5441) Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) proposed an amendment to increase funding for police, firefighters, and other local and state personnel by $16.5 billion.

A point of order was raised against Dodd's amendment based on the Budget Act, and the Senate effectively killed the amendment when it rejected the motion to wave the Budget Act. The vote was 38-62 on July 13, 2006 (Roll Call 197). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal funding of local law enforcement will lead to more federal control of law enforcement.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 4615 to H.R. 5441 (Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2007): To prohibit the confiscation of a firearm during an emergency or major disaster if the possession of such firearm is not prohibited under Federal or State law.
Vote Date: July 13, 2006Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Firearm Seizure. During consideration for the Homeland Security appropriations bill (H.R. 5441) Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) offered an amendment that would prohibit any funds in the bill from being used to seize lawfully owned firearms during a state of emergency. Vitter said this amendment was prompted by the confiscation of over 1,000 firearms by law enforcement officials in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

The Senate overwhelmingly passed the Vitter amendment by a vote of 84-16 on July 13, 2006 (Roll Call 202). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because gun confiscation violates the Second Amendment.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 4442 to S. 2766 (John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007): To require the redeployment of United States Armed Forces from Iraq in order to further a political solution in Iraq, encourage the people of Iraq to provide for their own security, and achieve victory in the war on terror.
Vote Date: June 22, 2006Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Iraq Troop Withdrawal. Senator John Kerry (D-Mass.) attached this amendment to the Defense authorization bill (S. 2766) that would require the president to have a complete withdrawal of U.S. troops by July 2007, with the exception of those needed to train Iraqi troops, target terrorists, and protect American citizens.

The Senate rejected Kerry's amendment on June 22, 2006 by a vote of 13-86 (Roll Call 181). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because our troops should only be sent to war when necessary to defend the United States and her citizens, and only when declared by Congress.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 4322 to S. 2766 (John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007): To amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to provide for an increase in the Federal minimum wage.
Vote Date: June 21, 2006Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Minimum Wage. Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) offered this amendment to the Defense authorization bill (S. 2766). If implemented, the amendment would increase the national minimum wage from $5.15 to $7.25/hour within the next two years. Although a minimum wage increase sounds like an easy way to alleviate poverty in this country, it actually raises poverty. This is true because companies can not afford to hire entry-level workers and train them for careers; companies are forced to lay off workers they presently have on staff; and additional people are added to the welfare roles.

The Senate rejected Kennedy's amendment on June 21, 2006 by a vote of 52-46 (Roll Call 179). We have assigned pluses to the nays because it is unconstitutional for the government to prohibit citizens from working for less than a government-set price.



On the Nomination PN1552: General Michael V. Hayden, United States Air Force, to be Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
Vote Date: May 26, 2006Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Hayden Nomination. This measure would confirm Gen. Michael V. Hayden as the director of the Central Intelligence Agency, making him the first member of the military to hold the position. There are many concerns about Hayden leading the CIA, including Hayden's involvement in secret programs targeting unknowing U.S. citizens while principal deputy director of National Intelligence. The general was also the chief architect and defender of the controversial domestic surveillance program that President Bush has so adamantly supported.

The Senate confirmed General Hayden on May 26, 2006 by a vote of 78-15 (Roll Call 160). We have assigned pluses to the nays because Hayden has been in the forefront of governmental programs threatening the privacy of American citizens and should not be trusted to lead an organization such as the CIA.



On Passage of the Bill S. 2611: A bill to provide for comprehensive immigration reform and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 25, 2006Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Guest-worker/Amnesty Immigration "Reform." The Senate version of immigration "reform" (S. 2611) would effectively grant amnesty to the 12 million illegal immigrants who already reside in the United States and create a guest-worker program for up to 200,000 immigrants a year. Although S. 2611 may provide additional security at the border, it would also reward those who have broken the law by granting them legal status and establish an immigrant verification system managed by the Department of Homeland Security.

The Senate passed S. 2611 on May 25, 2006 by a vote of 62-36 (Roll Call 157). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the bill would reward those who have unlawfully entered the country with legal status and greatly increase the level of legal immigration through guest-worker programs.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3961 to S. 2611 (Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006): To prohibit the granting of legal status, or adjustment of current status, to any individual who enters or entered the United States in violation of Federal law unless the border security measures authorized under Title I and section 233 are fully completed and fully operational.
Vote Date: May 16, 2006Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Secure Borders Certification. During consideration of the immigration "reform" legislation (S. 2611), Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) introduced this amendment that would require the Department of Homeland Security to certify that the U.S. borders are secure and additional detention facilities for illegal aliens are functional before any guest-worker and legalization programs can take effect.

The Senate rejected Isakson's amendment on May 16, 2006 by a vote of 40-55 (Roll Call 121). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because this amendment would make border security a higher priority than amnesty, but would make it more difficult for the administration to implement amnesty.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 4939: A bill making emergency supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 4, 2006Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Supplemental Appropriations. The Senate version of H.R. 4939 would appropriate $108.9 billion in emergency supplemental funding in fiscal 2006, about $17 billion more than the House-passed version (see House bill below). Most of this funding difference is due to the additional Katrina aid the Senate version would provide, $28.9 billion as opposed to $19.2 billion.

[ The House Version of H.R. 4939 would appropriate a whopping $91.9 billion for emergency supplemental funding in fiscal 2006, including $67.6 billion for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, $4.3 billion for foreign aid, and $19.2 billion for Hurricane Katrina relief. Congressional Quarterly noted that the funding in the bill "for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan would push to more than $390 billion the war-related supplemental funds appropriated since Sept. 11. It would be the sixth major emergency spending measure for the Bush administration." ]

The Senate passed its version of H.R. 4939 by a vote of 77-21 on May 4, 2006 (Roll Call 112). We have assigned pluses to the nays because -- even if the spending were constitutional -- the funding should be attached to the regular appropriations process and not introduced after the fact as "emergency" spending, ignoring fiscal responsibility.



On the Joint Resolution H.J.Res. 47: A joint resolution increasing the statutory limit on the public debt.
Vote Date: March 16, 2006Vote: AYEBad Vote.
National Debt Limit. This legislation (House Joint Resolution 47) would increase the national debt limit, also known as the federal debt limit, to $8.97 trillion, a $781 billion increase in what the federal government is allowed to borrow.

The Senate adopted the measure to increase the national debt limit on March 16, 2006 by a vote of 52-48 (Roll Call 54). We have assigned pluses to the nays because raising the public debt limit by $781 billion facilitates a steady increase of gross fiscal irresponsibility.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3048 to S.Con.Res. 83: To increase the advance appropriations allowance in order to fund health, education and training, and low-income programs.
Vote Date: March 16, 2006Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Health and Education Programs. During consideration of the Fiscal 2007 Budget Resolution, Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) introduced this amendment that would provide for a $7 billion increase in funding for health, education and training, and poverty programs.

The Senate passed Specter's amendment on March 16, 2006 by a vote 73-27 (Roll Call 58). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal social-welfare programs are unconstitutional.



On the Conference Report H.R. 3199: A bill to extend and modify authorities needed to combat terrorism, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: March 2, 2006Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Patriot Act Reauthorization. This is the final version (conference report) of the Patriot Act reauthorization (H.R. 3199). In the weeks following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Congress quickly passed the so-called Patriot Act, which gave law enforcement and intelligence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. The act increased the ability of law enforcement to secretly search home and business records, expanded the FBI's wiretapping and surveillance authority, and expanded the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts. When passed in 2001 the bill included a "sunset" provision under which the new surveillance powers "shall cease to have effect on December 21, 2005." The Patriot Act reauthorization bill (H.R. 3199) considered by Congress last year would make permanent 14 of the 16 provisions included in the bill, and extend for four years the two remaining provisions.

The Senate adopted the conference report for H.R. 3199 on March 2, 2006 by a vote of 89-10 (Roll Call 29). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the Patriot Act tramples on the constitutionally protected rights of U.S. citizens.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2519 to S. 1042 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006): To clarify and recommend changes to the policy of the United States on Iraq and to require reports on certain matters relating to Iraq.
Vote Date: November 15, 2005Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Iraq Withdrawal. During consideration of the defense authorization bill (S. 1042), Rep. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) introduced this amendment requiring the president to provide Congress with a timetable for the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq within 30 days of the bill's implementation.

The Senate rejected the Levin amendment on November 15, 2005 by a vote of 40-58 (Roll Call 322). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because our troops should be sent to war only when necessary to defend the United States and her citizens, and when Congress declares war.



On the Conference Report H.R. 3057: An act making appropriations for the Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 10, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Foreign Aid. The final version (conference report) of this appropriations bill (H.R. 3057) would provide $21 billion for U.S. foreign aid programs in fiscal 2006.

The Senate passed this appropriations bill on November 10, 2005 by a unanimous vote of 91-0 (Roll Call 320). We have assigned minuses to the yeas because foreign aid programs are not authorized by the Constitution.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2744: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 3, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agriculture Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of this bill (H.R. 2744) would provide $101 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and related agencies. The funding includes $40.7 billion for the food-stamp program and $25.7 billion for the Commodity Credit Corporation, a federally funded program that aids farmers.

The Senate passed the final version of H.R. 2744 on November 3, 2005 by a vote of 81-18 (Roll Call 282). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to farmers and federal food aid to individuals are not authorized by the Constitution.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2358 to S. 1932 (Deficit Reduction Act of 2005): To strike the title relating to the establishment of an oil and gas leasing program in the Coastal Plain.
Vote Date: November 3, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
ANWR Oil and Gas Leasing. During consideration of the budget reconciliation bill (S. 1932), Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) offered an amendment that would delete from the underlying bill language allowing for "the establishment of an oil and gas leasing program in the Coastal Plain" of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska. Cantwell's intent was to keep in place the present ban against drilling for oil and natural gas in the energy-rich ANWR.

The Senate rejected the Cantwell amendment on November 3, 2005 by a vote of 48-51 (Roll Call 288). We have assigned pluses for the nays because the United States should reduce its dependence on foreign oil and develop its own energy resources.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3010: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 27, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Labor-HHS-Education. The Senate version of this mammoth social-welfare appropriations bill (H.R. 3010) would provide a total of $604.4 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Labor Department ($15 billion), the Education Department ($63.7 billion), the Health and Human Services Department ($476.2 billion), and related agencies.

The Senate passed this massive social-welfare bill on October 27, 2005 by a vote of 94-3 (Roll Call 281). We have assigned pluses to the nays because social-welfare programs are unconstitutional.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA Kenedy Amdt. No. 2063 As Modified Further): To provide for an increase in the Federal minimum wage.
Vote Date: October 19, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Minimum Wage Increase. During consideration of the Transportation-Treasury-Housing appropriations bill (H.R. 3058), Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) offered an amendment to raise the minimum wage from $5.15 an hour to $5.70 an hour six months after the bill's enactment, and then to $6.25 an hour one year after the bill's enactment. While raising the minimum wage may sound appealing to some unskilled workers, it would actually make many of them too expensive to hire, and it would also make starting up new companies more expensive.

The Senate rejected Kennedy's amendment on October 19, 2005 by a vote of 47-51 (Roll Call 257). We have assigned pluses to the nays because it is unconstitutional for the government to prohibit American citizens from working for less than a federally mandated minimum wage.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2744: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 22, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agriculture Appropriations. This bill (H.R. 2744) would provide $100.7 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Agriculture Department, the Food and Drug Administration, and related agencies. The funding includes $40.7 billion for the food stamp program, $12.4 billion for school meal programs, and $25.7 billion for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which aids farmers.

The Senate passed the Agriculture appropriations bill on September 22, 2005 by a vote of 97-2 (Roll Call 241). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to farmers and federal food aid to individuals are not authorized in the Constitution.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 1661 to H.R. 2862 (Science, State, Justice, Commerce, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2006): To provide emergency funding for victims of Hurricane Katrina.
Vote Date: September 13, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Funding Law Enforcement. During consideration of the Fiscal 2006 Commerce-Justice-Science appropriations bill (H.R. 2862), Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.) offered this amendment to increase funding for the Community Oriented Policing Services program by $1 billion, to increase funding for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children by $10 million, to increase funding for the Office of Violence Against Women by $9 million, and to designate these increases as emergency spending.

A point of order was made against the emergency designation based on the Budget Act, and the Senate effectively killed the Biden amendment when it rejected a motion to waive the Budget Act. The vote was 41-56 on September 13, 2005 (Roll Call 226). We have assigned pluses to the nays because providing federal aid to law enforcement programs is not only unconstitutional, but it also further federalizes the police system.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3673: A bill making further emergency supplemental appropriations to meet immediate needs arising from the consequences of Hurricane Katrina, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 8, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Katrina Hurricane-relief Appropriations. In the wake of the devastating hurricane disaster in the Gulf Coast, Congress quickly passed legislation that would appropriate $51.8 billion in emergency supplemental funding for fiscal 2005 (H.R. 3673) to be used for relief in the areas affected by Hurricane Katrina. Commenting on how the tragic images of Katrina were used to justify more federal welfare and interventionism, as opposed to private charity and initiatives, Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) noted on September 15, after the House and Senate votes: "These scenes prompted two emotional reactions. One side claims Katrina proved there was not enough government welfare.... The other side claims we need to pump billions of new dollars into the very federal agency that failed (FEMA).... Both sides support more authoritarianism, more centralization, and even the imposition of martial law in times of natural disasters."

The Senate passed this supplemental appropriations bill on September 8, 2005 by a vote of 97-0 (Roll Call 223). We have assigned minuses to the yeas because federally financing disaster relief is unconstitutional.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2361: A bill making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 29, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Interior-Environment Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of this appropriations bill (H.R. 2361) would provide $26.2 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Interior Department, the Environmental Protection Agency, and related agencies, including $7.7 billion for the EPA. All but roughly $50 million provided in H.R. 2361 is deemed "discretionary" funds.

The Senate passed this appropriations bill on July 29, 2005 by a vote of 99-1 (Roll Call 210). We have assigned a plus to the lone nay because the bill's provisions include both unnecessary and unconstitutional spending.



On the Conference Report H.R. 3: A bill to authorize funds for Federal-aid highways, highway safety programs, and transit programs, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 29, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Surface Transportation. The final version (conference report) of this bill (H.R. 3) would authorize $286.5 billion for federal highway, mass transit, and safety and research programs through fiscal 2009. The bill is laden with thousands of "pork barrel" transportation projects requested by individual lawmakers.

The Senate adopted the conference report on July 29, 2005 by a vote of 91-4 (Roll Call 220). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the bill increases transportation spending and is fiscally irresponsible.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3057: An act making appropriations for the Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 20, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Foreign Aid. The Senate version of the foreign aid appropriations bill (H.R. 3057) would provide $31.8 billion in fiscal 2006 for U.S. foreign aid programs.

The Senate passed this appropriations bill on July 20, 2005 by a vote of 98-1 (Roll Call 197). We have assigned a plus to the lone nay because foreign aid is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 1242 to H.R. 3057 (Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2006): To prohibit any funds from being used by the Export-Import Bank of the United States to approve a loan or a loan guarantee related to a nuclear project in China.
Vote Date: July 19, 2005Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Nuclear Power Plants in China. During consideration of the foreign aid appropriations bill, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) introduced this amendment to prohibit the Export-Import Bank, a U.S. government agency, from providing federal loans or loan guarantees for the construction of nuclear power plants in China. The amendment would block federal assistance to the British-owned nuclear division of Westinghouse to build such plants.

The Senate rejected Coburn's amendment on July 19, 2005 by a vote of 37-62 (Roll Call 192). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because foreign aid programs are unconstitutional.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1307: A bill to implement the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement.
Vote Date: June 30, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
CAFTA. This bill (S. 1307) would implement the proposed Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), thereby expanding both the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the job losses wrought by NAFTA. CAFTA is intended by the Power Elite to be a steppingstone from NAFTA to the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), which would include all of the countries of the Western Hemisphere except (for now) Cuba. Like NAFTA, which has already begun imposing its trade rulings on America, CAFTA and the FTAA would not be genuine free trade arrangements; they would instead manage trade and would gradually exercise more powers on the road to a supranational government modeled after the EU.

The Senate passed the CAFTA bill on June 30, 2005 by a vote of 54-45 (Roll Call 170). We have assigned pluses to the nays because CAFTA would further damage the U.S. economy and threaten U.S. sovereignty.



On the Conference Report H.R. 1268: An act making Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 10, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Supplemental Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of this supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 1268) would add another $82 billion to the federal budget for fiscal 2005. The supplemental spending, even if needed and constitutional, should not have been added on to the annual federal budget after the fact, but should have been included as part of the regular appropriations process. The supplemental spending in this bill includes $75.9 billion for defense-related purposes, most of it for the military occupation of Iraq, and $907 million for tsunami victims, the latter clearly unconstitutional.

One particularly objectionable element of this legislation is the REAL ID Act, which was added to the supplemental appropriations bill by the conference committee. The REAL ID Act would authorize the federal government to impose national standards for driver's licenses and thereby develop a national ID system.

The Senate adopted the conference report on May 10, 2005 by a vote of 100-0 (Roll Call 117). We assigned minuses to the yeas because the bill contains both unconstitutional spending and the REAL ID Act.



On the Cloture Motion S.Amdt. 375 to H.R. 1268 (Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005): To provide for the adjustment of status of certain foreign agricultural workers, to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to reform the H-2A worker program under that Act, to provide a stable, legal agricultural workforce, to extend basic legal protections and better working conditions to more workers, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: April 19, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
AgJOBS (Amnesty). Sen. Larry Craig (R-Idaho) tried to get the so-called AgJOBS bill through the Senate by attaching it as an amendment to the supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 1268). The AgJOBS measure would grant agricultural workers who are in this country illegally temporary residence status, thereby granting them amnesty and putting them on a path toward U.S. citizenship. If adopted, AgJOBS would be an open invitation for other non-citizens to cross our borders illegally with the expectation that they too would receive amnesty.

AgJOBS supporters attempted to push their measure forward by invoking "cloture," thereby limiting the debate that has stalled the measure, bringing it up for a vote. A three-fifths majority vote of the entire Senate (60 votes) is needed to invoke cloture. The Senate rejected the motion to invoke cloture on April 19, 2005 by a vote of 53-45 (Roll Call 98). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the AgJOBS measure would provide amnesty to many illegal aliens.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 464 to H.R. 1268 (Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005): To express the sense of the Senate on future requests for funding for military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Vote Date: April 18, 2005Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Budgeting for Overseas Military Operations. During consideration of the supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 1268), Senator Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) proposed a nonbinding amendment stating that "any request for funds ... for an ongoing military operation overseas, including operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, should be included in the annual budget of the President." Arguing for his amendment on the Senate floor, Byrd expressed frustration that funding for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan has been provided by "stopgap spending" and "emergency supplemental spending bills," when this funding should instead be accounted for in the annual budget.

The Senate adopted this amendment on April 18, 2005 by a vote of 61-31 (Roll Call 96). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because the amendment would encourage fiscal responsibility.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 278 to S. 600 (Foreign Affairs Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007): To prohibit the application of certain restrictive eligibility requirements to foreign nongovernmental organizations with respect to the provision of assistance under part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
Vote Date: April 5, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Abortion. During consideration of the State Department authorization bill (S. 600), Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) offered an amendment to repeal the rule prohibiting U.S. foreign aid from going to organizations that provide or promote abortions. Known as the "Mexico City" policy, this rule was imposed by President Reagan, lifted by President Clinton, and then reinstated by the second President Bush.

The Senate adopted Boxer's amendment on April 5, 2005 by a vote of 52-46 (Roll Call 83). We have assigned pluses to the nays because any federal aid to provide or promote abortions violates the right to life.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 239 to S.Con.Res. 18: Relative to funding to the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.
Vote Date: March 17, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Funding Local Law Enforcement. During consideration of the budget resolution (S. Con. Res. 18), Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.) offered an amendment to increase funding for the COPS (Community Oriented Policing Services) program by $1 billion. (As described in the amendment's "Purpose," this additional funding will be "fully off-set by closing corporate loopholes and will generate $2 billion in revenue" -- that is, additional taxes.)

The Senate rejected Biden's amendment on March 17, 2005 by a vote of 45-55 (Roll Call 70). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to local police forces is unconstitutional and invites federal control.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 202 to S.Con.Res. 18: No Statement of Purpose on File.
Vote Date: March 17, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Funding Special Education. During consideration of the budget resolution (S. Con. Res. 18), Sen. Mark Dayton (D-Minn.) offered an amendment to provide a fund of $71.3 billion for special education programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

The Senate rejected this amendment on March 17, 2005 by a vote of 37-63 (Roll Call 79). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal funding of education is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 168 to S.Con.Res. 18: To strike section 201(a)(4) relative to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Vote Date: March 16, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Alaskan Drilling. During consideration of the budget resolution (S. Con. Res. 18), Senator Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) offered an amendment to delete language in the resolution that would allow leases for oil and gas exploration and development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Like a similar House amendment (see House bill below), the intent behind this amendment is to continue the ban against drilling for oil and gas in the ANWR.

[ Rep. Edward Markey (D-Mass.) offered an amendment to delete language in the energy policy bill (H.R. 6) that would allow leases for oil and gas exploration and development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska. Drilling in ANWR is now banned, and Markey wants to keep it that way despite the fact that ANWR likely contains billions of barrels of oil and could be on a par with Prudhoe Bay, North America's largest oil field. ]

The Senate rejected Cantwell's amendment on March 16, 2005 by a vote of 49-51 (Roll Call 52). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the United States should develop its own energy resources and reduce its dependence on foreign oil.



On Passage of the Bill S. 250: A bill to amend the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 to improve the Act.
Vote Date: March 10, 2005Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Vocational/Technical Training. This legislation, like the House version (see House bill below), would reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act. The Senate version (S. 250) would authorize $1.3 billion for vocational and job training programs.

[ H.R. 366 would reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, which funds vocational and technical education programs. The bill would authorize $1.3 billion in fiscal 2006 and "such funds as necessary" in fiscal 2007-11. It would also merge Perkins funding with "Tech-Prep," a program that provides certain math and science courses to high school students to "ease the transition" from high school to a vocational or community college. ]

The Senate passed S. 250 on March 10, 2005 by a vote of 99-0 (Roll Call 43). We have assigned minuses to the yeas because federal aid to education and job-training programs is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 44 to S. 256 (Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005): To amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to provide for an increase in the Federal minimum wage.
Vote Date: March 7, 2005Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Minimum Wage. During consideration of the bankruptcy overhaul bill (S. 256), Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) offered an amendment to raise the minimum wage from $5.15 an hour to $7.25 an hour. The minimum wage was last raised in 1996 by 90 cents, a far less ambitious amount than Kennedy's $2.10 proposed increase. While this proposal may look tempting to many unskilled workers, it would actually make many of them too expensive to hire.

The Senate rejected Kennedy's amendment on March 7, 2005 by a vote of 46-49 (Roll Call 26). We have assigned pluses to the nays because it is unconstitutional for the government to prohibit citizens from working for less than a government-set minimum wage.



On the Conference Report H.R. 1308: An act to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide tax relief for working families, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 23, 2004Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Extending Tax Cuts. The final version (conference report) of this tax-cut legislation (H.R. 1308) would benefit most Americans by extending the life of several middle-class tax breaks set to expire at the end of this year. It would extend provisions providing relief from the "marriage penalty" through 2008, extend the $1,000 per child income tax credit through 2009, and keep a greater number of taxpayers in the 10 percent income tax bracket through 2010. It would also revive some expired business tax incentives.

The Senate adopted the conference report on H.R. 1308 on September 23, 2004 by a vote of 92 to 3 (Roll Call 188). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because the bill would extend the life of tax cuts, benefiting a large number of Americans.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA Re: Dodd Amdt. No. 3604): To increase the among provided for first responder programs, and to provide offsets.
Vote Date: September 9, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Federal Funding of First Responders. During consideration of the Homeland Security appropriations bill (H.R. 4567), Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) proposed an amendment to increase funding by $15.8 billion for police, fire fighters, and other local and state emergency personnel. It would also require the Secretary of the Treasury to "take such action as is necessary" to offset this additional expense by reducing tax savings under the 2001 tax law for individuals making $1 million or more.

A point of order was raised against Dodd's amendment based on Budget Act requirements, and that, in turn, led to a motion to waive the point of order. The Senate rejected the motion -- thereby killing the amendment -- on September 9, 2004 by a vote of 41 to 53 (Roll Call 170). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal funding of local law enforcement will lead to more federal control, and the federal government should not be funding local law enforcement in the first place.



On the Motion (DeWine Amdt. No. 3563): To protect the public health by providing the Food and Drug Administration with certain authority to regulate tobacco products, to eliminate the Federal quota and price support programs for tobacco, and to provide assistance to quota holders, tobacco producers, and tobacco-dependent communities.
Vote Date: July 15, 2004Vote: AYEBad Vote.
FDA Regulation of Tobacco. During consideration of a corporate tax bill (H.R. 4520), Sen. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) offered an amendment to authorize the FDA to regulate tobacco for the first time and to couple this new regulation with a $12 billion, 10-year buyout to pay tobacco farmers for relinquishing government quotas governing how much tobacco they can grow. The FDA would be authorized to ban many ingredients in cigarettes, but Congress would retain veto power over any regulatory attempt to ban nicotine in cigarettes or to ban cigarettes completely.

The Senate adopted DeWine's amendment on July 15, 2004 by a vote of 78 to 15 (Roll Call 157). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the FDA should not be regulating tobacco like a pharmaceutical drug.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3502 to H.R. 4613 (Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2005): To express the sense of the Senate on budgeting and funding of ongoing military operations overseas.
Vote Date: June 24, 2004Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Budgeting for Overseas Military Operations. During consideration of the Defense appropriations bill (H.R. 4613), Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) proposed a nonbinding amendment urging that the president include in his annual budget "any request for funds ... for an ongoing military operation overseas, including operations in Afghanistan and Iraq," and that such funding should be appropriated in regular accounts. In remarks on the Senate floor, Byrd expressed frustration that the administration has failed to estimate war costs and has made "stop-gap" and "emergency supplemental" spending requests that have caused mistakes in materiel requisitions -- the failure to request sufficient funds for body armor, for instance. Byrd described his amendment as "a simple, common-sense approach that promotes fiscal responsibility."

The Senate adopted Byrd's amendment on June 24, 2004 by a vote of 89 to 9 (Roll Call 147). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because his amendment would encourage fiscal responsibility.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3520 to H.R. 4613 (Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2005): To appropriate funds for bilateral economic assistance.
Vote Date: June 24, 2004Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Foreign Aid. During consideration of the Defense appropriations bill (H.R. 4613), Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.) proposed an amendment to add $118 million in emergency funding "to respond to the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan and in Chad." The $118 million would be on top of $95 million already provided by the bill for that purpose.

The Senate agreed to a motion to table (kill) Biden's amendment on June 24, 2004 by a vote of 53 to 45 (Roll Call 148). We have assigned pluses to the yeas -- that is, those who voted to kill the amendment -- because foreign aid is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3338 to S. 2400 (Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005): To reallocate for Ground-based Midcourse interceptors to homeland defense and combatting terrorism.
Vote Date: June 22, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Missile Defense. Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) offered an amendment to shift $515.5 million in the Defense authorization bill (S. 2400) from ground-based missile interceptors to nuclear nonproliferation programs and homeland security.

The Senate rejected Levin's amendment on June 22, 2004 by a vote of 44 to 56 (Roll Call 133). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the U.S. needs a means of protecting the homeland against incoming ballistic missiles.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3368 to S. 2400 (Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005): To allow deployment of the ground-based midcourse defense element of the national ballistic missile defense system only after the mission-related capabilities of the system have been confirmed by operationally realistic testing.
Vote Date: June 17, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Missile Defense. During consideration of the Defense authorization bill (S. 2400), Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) offered an amendment that would prohibit deployment of a ground-based system of missile interceptors until "the Secretary of Defense certifies ... that the capabilities of the system ... have been confirmed by operationally realistic testing of the system." The problem with Boxer's amendment is that the system cannot be operationally tested without initial deployment, scheduled for later in the year in Alaska. "If you prohibit this 'deployment,' you prohibit operationally realistic testing -- and prevent the very basis for the certification that the amendment requires," noted Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John Warner (R-Va.).

The Senate rejected Boxer's amendment on June 17, 2004 by a vote of 42 to 57 (Roll Call 124). We have assigned pluses to the nays because national defense is a constitutional function of the federal government.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3379 to S. 2400 (Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005): To provide funds for the security and stabilization of Iraq by suspending a portion of the reduction in the highest income tax rate for individual taxpayers.
Vote Date: June 17, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Tax Rate Increase. Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.) proposed a measure, in the form of an amendment to the Defense authorization bill (S. 2400), to increase the top income tax rate from 35 percent to 36 percent, starting in 2005 and lasting until 2010. The additional revenue would be earmarked for security and stabilization operations in Iraq.

The Senate rejected Biden's amendment on June 17, 2004 by a vote of 44 to 53 (Roll Call 130). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the amendment would increase taxes.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3263 to S. 2400 (Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005): To prohibit the use of funds for the support of new nuclear weapons development under the Stockpile Services Advanced Concepts Initiative or for the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP).
Vote Date: June 15, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Nuclear Weapons Study. Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) sponsored this amendment to prohibit the use of $36.6 million authorized by the Defense authorization bill (S. 2400) for two feasibility studies into options for modernizing our nuclear stockpile -- one pertaining to "bunker buster" weapons that would explode deep underground, and the other an Advanced Concepts Initiative including research into a "low yield" nuclear weapon. Sen. Wayne Allard (R-Colo.), who opposed Kennedy's amendment, noted that our existing nuclear stockpile "was developed for a massive nuclear exchange with one nation. Today, these weapons are too powerful and may result in greater damage than necessary to neutralize a target."

The Senate rejected Kennedy's amendment on June 15, 2004 by a vote of 42 to 55 (Roll Call 113). We have assigned pluses to the nays because national defense is a constitutional function of the federal government.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3183 to S. 2400 (Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005): To provide Federal assistance to States and local jurisdictions to prosecute hate crimes.
Vote Date: June 15, 2004Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Hate Crimes. Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Ore.) proposed a measure, in the form of an amendment to the Defense authorization bill (S. 2400), to expand the definition of "hate crimes" to include assaults based on sexual orientation, gender, or disability. Current federal hate crimes law imposes stricter sentences when assaults are based on race, ethnicity, or religion.

The Senate adopted Smith's amendment on June 15, 2004 by a vote of 65 to 33 (Roll Call 114). We have assigned pluses to the nays because Smith's amendment would further federalize the criminal code, and because "hate crimes" measures are intended to punish not just criminal acts but the thoughts behind them.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 1350: A bill to reauthorize the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 13, 2004Vote: AYEBad Vote.
IDEA Reauthorization. This bill (H.R. 1350) would reauthorize the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It would provide for full federal funding by 2011 of 40 percent of the average per pupil costs for certain programs under IDEA by authorizing discretionary spending increases of $2.3 billion per year. For fiscal 2005, H.R. 1350 would authorize a total of $12.4 billion for IDEA grants.

The Senate passed H.R. 1350 on May 13, 2004 by a vote of 95 to 3 (Roll Call 94). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to education is unconstitutional.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA Re: Cantwell Amdt. No. 3114): To extend the Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation Act of 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 11, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Unemployment Insurance. This amendment by Senator Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) to S. 1637 (Corporate Tax Overhaul) would authorize a six-month federal program to provide an additional 13 weeks of unemployment benefits for people who have exhausted their 26 weeks of state jobless benefits.

Senator Don Nickles (R-Okla.) raised a point of order against the Cantwell amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Senator Cantwell moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Cantwell amendment, but the Senate rejected her motion on May 11, 2004 by a vote of 59 to 40 (Roll Call 88), thereby effectively killing the Cantwell amendment.

We have assigned pluses to the nays because payment of unemployment benefits is an unconstitutional activity of the federal government. A three-fifths majority (60) of the total Senate is required to waive the Budget Act.



On Passage of the Bill S. 150: A bill to make permanent the moratorium on taxes on Internet access and multiple and discriminatory taxes on electronic commerce imposed by the Internet Tax Freedom Act.
Vote Date: April 29, 2004Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Internet Tax Moratorium. This bill (S. 150), as amended, would extend the Internet tax moratorium for four years. The Senate passed S. 150 on April 29, 2004 by a vote of 93 to 3 (Roll Call 77).

We have assigned pluses to the yeas because this bill would prevent some forms of taxation on Internet users for an additional four years.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2937 to H.R. 4 (PRIDE Act): To provide additional funding for child care.
Vote Date: March 30, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Child-care Funding. This amendment to H.R. 4 (Welfare Reauthorization) would increase "mandatory" child-care funding by $6 billion over the next five years (fiscal 2005 to 2009). The federal government currently provides $4.8 billion annually for child care through a combination of "mandatory" and "discretionary" programs.

The Senate adopted this amendment to H.R. 4 on March 30, 2004 by a vote of 78 to 20 (Roll Call 64). We have assigned pluses to the nays because child care funding is an unconstitutional activity of the federal government.



On the Concurrent Resolution S.Con.Res. 95: An original concurrent resolution setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2005 and including the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2006 through 2009.
Vote Date: March 12, 2004Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Fiscal 2005 Budget Resolution. This resolution (Senate Concurrent Resolution 95) would establish broad spending and revenue targets over the next five years. It calls for $851 billion in "discretionary" spending (including $30 billion for supplemental funding of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan) and another $1.5 trillion in "mandatory" spending for fiscal 2005. Based on these targets, the "mandatory" spending portion of the budget would increase by 5 percent over last year, and the total budget -- a whopping $2.4 trillion -- would increase by 3 percent.

The Senate adopted S. Con. Res. 95 on March 12, 2004 by a vote of 51 to 45 (Roll Call 58). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this budget perpetuates the fiscally irresponsible, largely unconstitutional federal spending with its attendant record-breaking deficits of recent years.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2637 to S. 1805 (Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act): To provide for a 10-year extension of the assault weapons ban.
Vote Date: March 2, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Assault Weapons Ban. This amendment to S. 1805 (Firearms Manufacturers Protection) would provide for a 10-year reauthorization of the so-called assault weapons ban. If Congress doesn't vote to reauthorize the ban, it will expire in September 2004.

The Senate adopted this amendment to S. 1805 on March 2, 2004 by a vote of 52 to 47 (Roll Call 24). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this so-called assault weapons ban is an unconstitutional infringement on the Second Amendment.

Senate Republicans had introduced S. 1805 to help protect firearms manufacturers from industry-threatening lawsuits. However, they withdrew their support after gun control advocates won adoption of two "poison pill" amendments -- this amendment and a requirement for criminal background checks for all firearms purchases at gun shows (see S.Amdt. 2636 below) -- and S. 1805 was rejected.

[ Gun Show Checks. S.Amdt. 2636 to S. 1805 (Firearms Manufacturers Protection) would require criminal background checks on all firearms purchases at gun shows where at least 75 guns are sold. ]



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2636 to S. 1805 (Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act): To require criminal background checks on all firearms transactions occurring at events that provide a venue for the sale, offer for sale, transfer, or exchange of firearms, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: March 2, 2004Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Gun Show Checks. This amendment to S. 1805 (Firearms Manufacturers Protection) would require criminal background checks on all firearms purchases at gun shows where at least 75 guns are sold.

The Senate adopted this amendment to S. 1805 on March 2, 2004 by a vote of 53 to 46 (Roll Call 25). We have assigned pluses to the nays because these restrictions on firearm transactions at gun shows would be an unconstitutional infringement on the Second Amendment. Subsequently, the Senate rejected S. 1805 by a vote of 8 to 90.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1072: A bill to authorize funds for Federal-aid highways, highway safety programs, and transit programs, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: February 12, 2004Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Surface Transportation. This bill (S. 1072) would authorize $318 billion in federal aid over six years (fiscal 2004-2009) for highways ($255 billion), mass transit ($56.5 billion), and highway safety programs ($6 billion). This bill also promises that states would receive at least a 95 percent return on their highway trust fund "contributions" by 2009.

The Bush administration had wanted to limit the spending in the bill to $256 billion, which, noted White House spokesman Scott McClellan, would still increase
spending by 21 percent. But the Senate added an additional $62 billion to the bill (24 percent more than the president had requested).

The Senate passed S. 1072 on February 12, 2004 by a vote of 76 to 21 (Roll Call 14). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this double-digit increase in spending on surface transportation is fiscally irresponsible, particularly during a time of record-breaking federal deficits.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2673: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: January 22, 2004Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Fiscal 2004 Omnibus Appropriations. Adoption of this conference report on H.R. 2673 (Fiscal 2004 Omnibus Appropriations) would provide a total of $820 billion in fiscal 2004, including $328.1 billion in "discretionary" spending, for a whole laundry list of federal departments and agencies. On January 22, Congressional Quarterly described this bill as "among the biggest appropriations packages ever written by Congress." Total fiscal year 2004 spending (both "mandatory" and "discretionary") in this bill includes $80.6 billion (up 8.0 percent) for the Agriculture Department, Food and Drug Administration, Commodity Futures Trading Commission and related agencies; $38.4 billion (up 1.3 percent) for the Commerce, Justice and State departments and judicial agencies; $545 million (up 7.1 percent) for the District of Columbia; $17.3 billion (down 27 percent) for foreign aid and export assistance; $471.8 billion (up 11.5 percent) for the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Departments; $89.8 billion (up 3.7 percent) for the Transportation and Treasury Departments and related independent agencies; and $124.0 billion (up 4.4 percent) for the Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development Departments.

The Senate adopted the conference report on H.R. 2673 on January 22, 2004 by a vote of 65 to 28 (Roll Call 3). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this bill not only perpetuates huge amounts of unconstitutional federal spending, it also contains many spending increases for various federal agencies despite the fact that annual federal deficits have mushroomed to record levels.



On the Conference Report H.R. 1: An act to amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide for a voluntary prescription drug benefit under the medicare program and to strengthen and improve the medicare program, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 25, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Prescription Drug Benefit. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 1 would create a prescription drug benefit for Medicare recipients. Beginning in 2006, prescription coverage would be available to seniors through private insurers for a monthly premium estimated at $35. There would be a $250 annual deductible, then 75 percent of drug costs up to $2,250 would be reimbursed. Drug costs greater than $2,250 would not be covered until out-of-pocket expenses exceeded $3,600, after which 95 percent of drug costs would be reimbursed. Low-income recipients would receive more subsidies than other seniors by paying lower premiums, having smaller deductibles, and making lower co-payments for each prescription. The total cost of the new prescription drug benefit would be limited to the $400 billion that Congress had budgeted earlier this year for the first 10 years of this new entitlement program.

The Senate adopted the conference report on H.R. 1 on November 25, 2003 by a vote of 54 to 44 (Roll Call 459). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this landmark legislation establishes a major new, unconstitutional entitlement program.



On the Motion (Motion To Table Daschle Amdt. No. 2078): Expressing the sense of the Senate regarding country of origin labeling requirements.
Vote Date: November 6, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Country of Origin Labeling. The House version of H.R. 2673 (Fiscal 2004 Omnibus Appropriations) included a provision stating: "None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act shall be used for the implementation of Country of Origin Labeling for meat or meat products." The intent of this provision, of course, is to end country of origin labeling requirements for meat by denying the funding for enforcement. During Senate consideration of this legislation, Senator Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) offered an amendment expressing the "sense of the Senate" that the Senate conferees insist that no such restriction on the use of funding appear in the final version of the bill.

The Senate rejected a motion to table (kill) this amendment to H.R. 2673 on November 6, 2003 by a vote of 36 to 58 (Roll Call 443). We have assigned pluses to the "nays" -- that is, those who opposed killing the amendment -- because country of origin labeling is a useful tool for (to quote the Constitution) "regulating commerce with foreign nations." The Daschle amendment was adopted by voice vote later the same day.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2673: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 6, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agriculture Appropriations. The Senate version of H.R. 2673 would appropriate $79.7 billion for agriculture, rural development, and nutrition programs in fiscal 2004. Over half of the money appropriated by this "agriculture" bill is earmarked for so-called mandatory spending on nutrition programs, including $30 billion for food stamps and $16 billion for school lunch and other nutrition programs. (See House version below.)

[ House Version: H.R. 2673 would appropriate $77.5 billion for agriculture, rural development and nutrition programs in fiscal 2004. Over half of the money appropriated by this "agriculture" bill is earmarked for so-called mandatory spending on nutrition programs, including $28 billion for food stamps and $16 billion for school lunch and other nutrition programs. Total spending for traditional agricultural programs is $26.8 billion, a 5 percent increase. ]

The Senate passed H.R. 2673 on November 6, 2003 by a vote of 93 to 1 (Roll Call 444). We have assigned a plus to the nays because federal aid to farmers and federal food aid to individuals are unconstitutional activities of the federal government.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 2065 to S. 1753 (National Consumer Credit Reporting System Improvement Act of 2003): To provide for data-mining reports to Congress.
Vote Date: November 4, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Data Mining. This amendment to S. 1753 (National Consumer Credit Reporting System Improvement Act of 2003) would require each federal agency or department engaged in data mining to submit a public report to Congress. Data mining involves the use of computer systems to scan through vast amounts of electronic information to detect patterns and trends. Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.) introduced this amendment because of his concerns about Total Information Awareness-type programs being developed at various federal agencies. His amendment would require the reports to Congress to assess "the likely impact of the implementation of the data-mining technology on privacy and civil liberties...."

The Senate agreed to a motion to table (kill) this amendment to S. 1753 on November 4, 2003 by a vote of 61 to 32 (Roll Call 435). We have assigned pluses to the "nays" -- that is, those who opposed killing the amendment -- because federal data mining activity is clearly a threat to the Fourth Amendment, which guarantees "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures."



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2028 to S. 139 (Climate Stewardship Act of 2003): To provide for a program of scientific research on abrupt climate change, to accelerate the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States by establishing a market-driven system of greenhouse gas tradeable allowances, to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States and reduce dependence upon foreign oil, and ensure benefits to consumers from the trading in such allowances.
Vote Date: October 30, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Global Warming. This substitute amendment to S. 139 (Climate Stewardship Act of 2003) by Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) would mandate that so-called greenhouse gas emissions be reduced to 2000 levels by 2010. Greenhouse gases would be defined as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons and sulfur hexafluoride. Other provisions of the substitute amendment include a program of scientific research on climate change, a national greenhouse database, and a market driven system of greenhouse gas tradable allowances.

The Senate rejected this substitute amendment to S. 139 on October 30, 2003 by a vote of 43 to 55 (Roll Call 420). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this amendment would have established restrictions on so-called greenhouse gas emissions based on the myth of catastrophic global warming.



On the Conference Report S. 3: A bill to prohibit the procedure commonly known as partial-birth abortion.
Vote Date: October 21, 2003Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Partial-birth Abortion Ban. The final version (conference report) of S. 3 would ban partial-birth abortions. Although on March 12 the Senate had amended their version of S. 3 to include a reaffirmation of Roe v. Wade, on September 30 a 10-member House-Senate conference committee agreed to report out a final version of the bill identical to one (H.R. 760) that passed the House earlier this year without any reaffirmation of Roe v. Wade. Of course, all abortion procedures should be banned. But this bill is still a step in the right direction in that it is better to ban one abortion procedure than to ban none at all.

The Senate adopted the conference report on S. 3 on October 21, 2003 by a vote of 64 to 34 (Roll Call 402). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because all forms of abortion constitute the murder of preborn children, and the Supreme Court, in its Roe v. Wade decision, overstepped its proper authority by "legalizing" abortion in the first place.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1689: An original bill making emergency supplemental appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan security and reconstruction for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 17, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Supplemental Spending for Iraq & Afghanistan. The Senate version of this bill (S. 1689) would appropriate $86.5 billion in fiscal 2004 supplemental spending for military operations and reconstruction in Iraq and Afghanistan. Unlike the House version (H.R. 3289), S. 1689 also included an amendment requiring that $10 billion of the approximately $20 billion in Iraqi reconstruction aid be initially offered as a loan -- and be converted into a grant only if 90 percent of Iraq's bilateral debts, estimated at $130 billion, are forgiven by its creditors. (This amendment was deleted from the final version of this legislation, known as the conference report. The conference report was approved by voice vote in the Senate and roll call vote in the House.)

The Senate passed S. 1689 on October 17, 2003 by a vote of 87 to 12 (Roll Call 400). We have assigned pluses to the nays because the U.S. military was sent into Iraq to enforce UN resolutions, when the only proper use of our nation's armed forces is to protect the lives and property of American citizens, and the huge U.S.-funded infrastructure rebuilding program in Iraq and Afghanistan is another example of unconstitutional foreign aid.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2660: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 10, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations. The Senate version of this bill (H.R. 2660) would appropriate $472 billion for the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Departments for fiscal 2004, a 10 percent increase over fiscal 2003. This bill, the biggest of the fiscal 2004 domestic spending bills, includes $138 billion for discretionary spending. (Since the Senate version of H.R. 2660 is virtually identical to the House version, see House version below for additional details.)

[ House Version H.R. 2660 would appropriate $470 billion for the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Departments for fiscal 2004, a 10 percent increase over fiscal 2003. This bill, the biggest of the fiscal 2004 domestic spending bills, includes $138 billion for discretionary spending, including $55.4 billion for education and $22.7 billion for the National Institutes of Health. That leaves $332 billion for so-called mandatory spending on entitlement programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, and unemployment insurance. ]

The Senate passed H.R. 2660 on September 10, 2003 by a vote of 94 to 0 (Roll Call 347). We have assigned minuses to the yeas because this bill represents a significant increase in spending, and these departments are not authorized by the Constitution.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2739: A bill to implement the United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement.
Vote Date: July 31, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
U.S.-Singapore Trade. This bill (H.R. 2739) would implement a trade agreement to reduce tariffs and trade barriers between the United States and Singapore. A similar bill, the U.S.-Chile Trade Agreement (H.R. 2738), was presented to Congress at the same time as the U.S.-Singapore Trade Agreement. These are the first in a series of bilateral and regional free trade agreements (FTAs) that the Bush administration is negotiating, which will culminate in 2005 in the largest and most significant FTA of them all, the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).

The model for the FTAA is the European Union (EU), formerly the "Common Market," which has grown by design from a supposed free trade agreement into a supranational government for Europe. The world order architects intend for the FTAA to follow the same trajectory for the Americas.

The Senate passed H.R. 2739 on July 31, 2003 by a vote of 66 to 32 (Roll Call 318). We have assigned pluses to the nays because these bilateral "free trade" agreements are intended to be stepping-stones to the FTAA, which would set trade (and eventually other) policies for the member nations. However, under the U.S. Constitution only Congress has the power "to regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states...."



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2738: A bill to implement the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement.
Vote Date: July 31, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
U.S.-Chile Trade. This bill (H.R. 2738) would implement a trade agreement to reduce tariffs and trade barriers between the United States and Chile. (The significance of this trade agreement, like that of the U.S.-Singapore Trade Agreement, is described below.)

[ U.S.-Singapore Trade. This bill (H.R. 2739) would implement a trade agreement to reduce tariffs and trade barriers between the United States and Singapore. A similar bill, the U.S.-Chile Trade Agreement (H.R. 2738), was presented to Congress at the same time as the U.S.-Singapore Trade Agreement. These are the first in a series of bilateral and regional free trade agreements (FTAs) that the Bush administration is negotiating, which will culminate in 2005 in the largest and most significant FTA of them all, the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).

The model for the FTAA is the European Union (EU), formerly the "Common Market," which has grown by design from a supposed free trade agreement into a supranational government for Europe. The world order architects intend for the FTAA to follow the same trajectory for the Americas. ]


The Senate passed H.R. 2738 on July 31, 2003 by a vote of 65 to 32 (Roll Call 319). We have assigned pluses to the nays because these bilateral "free trade" agreements are intended to be stepping-stones to the FTAA, which would set trade (and eventually other) policies for the member nations. However, under the U.S. Constitution only Congress has the power "to regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states...."



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 1384 to S. 14 (Energy Policy Act of 2003): To amend title 49, United States Code, to improve the system for enhancing automobile fuel efficiency.
Vote Date: July 29, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Fuel Economy Standards. This amendment to S. 14 (Energy Policy Act of 2003) by Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) would mandate an increase in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. The CAFE standard for passenger vehicles made before 2006 would be 25 miles per gallon. From model years 2006 to 2015 the CAFE standard would gradually increase to 40 miles per gallon. This new standard would initially be less than the current 27.5 miles per gallon, but only because "passenger automobile" would be redefined to include the previously exempted SUVs and passenger vans.

Since neither legislators nor manufacturers have a magic wand to reduce the amount of gas required to move a certain mass a certain distance, this radical legislation -- akin to ordering the sun never to set -- would effectively force manufacturers to reduce vehicle size, thereby limiting consumer choices and making vehicles less safe.

The Senate rejected this amendment to S. 14 on July 29, 2003 by a vote of 32 to 65 (Roll Call 309). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this amendment would have authorized unconstitutional regulation of consumer choice of vehicle size.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2: To provide for reconciliation pursuant to section 201 of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2004.
Vote Date: May 23, 2003Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Tax Reductions. The final version of the $350 billion tax-cut package (the conference report on H.R. 2) would provide tax breaks over 11 years. Dividends, currently taxed the same as other earned income, would instead be taxed at 15 percent for most taxpayers through 2008. Lower-income dividend recipients would be taxed at 5 percent through 2007 and nothing in 2008. The current 20 percent top rate on capital gains on investments held at least one year would drop to 15 percent, with lower-income investors paying 5 percent through 2007 and nothing in 2008. Both dividend and capital gains tax reductions would expire after 2008. Among other tax reductions, income tax cuts enacted in 2001 for individuals and scheduled to be effective in 2006 would be accelerated; parents would receive refunds of up to $400 per child this summer.

The Senate adopted the conference report on H.R. 2 on May 23, 2003 with Vice President Cheney casting a yea vote to break a 50 to 50 tie (Roll Call 196). We have assigned pluses to the yeas because this bill will cut taxes for large numbers of Americans, both individuals and businesses.



On Passage of the Bill H.J.Res. 51: A joint resolution increasing the statutory limit on the public debt.
Vote Date: May 23, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Debt Limit Increase. This resolution (House Joint Resolution 51) would raise the public debt ceiling by $984 billion. Last year the public debt ceiling was increased by $450 billion. These huge increases in the public debt ceiling are necessitated by the fact that federal spending is increasing -- and so are the annual deficits. The solution is not to allow the federal government to borrow more money but to cut spending.

The Senate passed H. J. Res. 51 on May 23, 2003 by a vote of 53 to 44 (Roll Call 202). We have assigned pluses to the nays because raising the public debt limit by $984 billion facilitates continued, gross fiscal irresponsibility.



On the Motion (Motion To Waive C.B.A. Kennedy Amdt No. 544): To provide for additional weeks of temporary extended unemployment compensation and to provide for a program of temporary enhanced regular unemployment compensation, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 15, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Budget Resolution -- Final Version. The final version (conference report) of the budget resolution (House Concurrent Resolution 95) would authorize federal spending for fiscal 2004 of $1,861 billion dollars with a deficit of $558 billion and an increase in the public debt ceiling of $984 billion. This planned deficit of $558 billion dwarfs the previous record federal deficit of $290 billion in 1992. The $984 billion increase in the public debt ceiling authorized in this bill constituted, under Rule XXVII of the House, approval of the debt limit increase bill (House Joint Resolution 51) without having to cast a separate vote just on increasing the debt ceiling. Subsequently the Senate passed H. J. Res. 51 and President Bush signed it into law, increasing the public debt ceiling by $984 billion (for a new total of $7.4 trillion) and giving Congress a green light to continue its fiscally irresponsible ways. This resolution also includes $400 billion for a Medicare prescription drug benefit for 2004-2013.

The Senate adopted the conference is similar to H.R. 2185. It would extend the Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation Act of 2002 through November; however, it would provide 26 weeks of federal aid, compared to 13 weeks in H.R. 2185, to workers in all states who have exhausted their 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. There would be an additional seven weeks of federal aid for workers in the states with the highest unemployment.

A point of order was raised against Kennedy's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. The Senate failed to waive the Budget Act with respect to Kennedy's amendment on May 15, 2003 by a vote of 50 to 49 (Roll Call 152). A three-fifths majority vote (60) of the total Senate is needed to waive the Budget Act. We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to unemployed workers is unconstitutional.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive C.B.A. re: Murray Amdt. No. 564): To provide temporary State fiscal relief.
Vote Date: May 15, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
State Aid. This proposed amendment to the Senate version of the tax reductions bill (S. 1054) would provide $40 billion in aid to states. Half of this would be for general revenue sharing with states and their local governments. The other half would be used to increase federal Medicaid assistance to states for the last two quarters of fiscal 2003 and all of fiscal 2004.

A point of order was raised against this amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. The Senate failed to waive the Budget Act with respect to the amendment on May 15, 2003 by a vote of 47 to 52 (Roll Call 158). A three-fifths majority vote (60) of the total Senate is needed to waive the Budget Act. We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to the states for revenue sharing and medical assistance is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 409 to S.Con.Res. 23: To provide full and mandatory funding for IDEA beginning in FY2004.
Vote Date: March 26, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) Funding. This proposed amendment to the Senate version of the budget resolution (Senate Concurrent Resolution 23) resembles H.R. 1350 as considered by the House (see House bill below). However, whereas the House bill would gradually increase the federal government's share of aid for educating special education students from 18 percent to 40 percent by 2010, this amendment would immediately increase the federal government's share to 40 percent in fiscal 2004 and maintain this level over the next 10 years -- increasing federal IDEA spending by $229 billion over that same period.

[ H.R. 1350 would reauthorize the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. One of its provisions would authorize increasing federal grants to defray more of the state cost of educating special education students, from the current 18 percent to 40 percent by 2010. Other provisions would allow school personnel to discipline special education students the same as non-disabled students, reduce paperwork requirements for special education teachers, and limit parents’ ability to sue school districts. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that H.R. 1350 would cost $50 billion over the 2004-2009 period. ]

The Senate rejected this amendment on March 26, 2003 by a vote of 28 to 70 (Roll Call 103). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to education is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 278 to S.Con.Res. 23: To make available funds for the COPS program.
Vote Date: March 21, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
COPS (Community Oriented Policing Services) Funding. This proposed amendment to the Senate version of the budget resolution (Senate Concurrent Resolution 23) states: "It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this resolution assume that an increase of $1,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2004 for the Department of Justice's community oriented policing program will be provided without reduction and consistent with previous appropriated and authorized levels." This amendment was introduced because the president had only requested $164 million for the COPS program for fiscal 2004. Adoption of this amendment would express the sense of the Senate that funding for the COPS program should be continued at the same level as for fiscal years 2002 and 2003, $1 billion per year.

The Senate rejected this amendment on March 21, 2003 by a vote of 48 to 52 (Roll Call 78). We have assigned pluses to the nays because federal aid to local police forces invites federal control and is unconstitutional.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 260 to S. 3 (Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003): To express the sense of the Senate concerning the decision of the Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade.
Vote Date: March 12, 2003Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Roe v. Wade Support. This proposed amendment to the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban (S. 3) states: "It is the sense of the Senate that -- (1) the decision of the Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade (410 U.S. 113 (1973)) was appropriate and secures an important constitutional right; and (2) such a decision should not be overturned." Since this amendment supporting Roe v. Wade was adopted, we have opted to score the vote on this amendment rather than the vote on the resulting, severely compromised, Senate bill to ban partial-birth abortion.

The Senate adopted this amendment on March 12, 2003 by a vote of 52 to 46 (Roll Call 48). We have assigned pluses to the nays because Roe v. Wade should be overturned on the basis that all forms of abortion constitute the murder of unborn children -- and that the Supreme Court was overstepping its proper authority by "legalizing" abortion in the first place.



On the Resolution of Ratification Treaty Doc. 107-8: The Treaty Between the United States of America and the Russian Federation on Strategic Offensive Reductions, Signed at Moscow on May 24, 2002
Vote Date: March 6, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Moscow Treaty. This treaty, known as the "Moscow Treaty," would require both the United States and Russia to reduce their respective nuclear stockpiles to between 1,700 and 2,200 warheads by 2012. This treaty is a continuation of the decades-old U.S. program for "general and complete disarmament" originally proposed in the 1961 State Department document Freedom From War. Under that plan, the goal is to disarm all countries, including the U.S., to "a point where no state would have the military power to challenge the progressively strengthened U.N. Peace Force."

The Senate ratified the Moscow Treaty on March 6, 2003 by a vote of 95 to 0 (Roll Call 43). We have assigned minuses to the yeas because the Moscow Treaty is just one more step in a UN disarmament process that would culminate in the complete loss of our national sovereignty.



On the Conference Report H.J.Res. 2: Joint Resolution making consolidated appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2003, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: February 13, 2003Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of House Joint Resolution 2 would provide $397 billion in fiscal 2003 for all Cabinet departments and government agencies covered in 11 unfinished spending bills from the 107th Congress. The bills included are: Agriculture, Commerce-Justice-State, District of Columbia, Energy and Water Development, Foreign Operations, Interior, Labor-HHS-Education, Legislative Branch, Transportation, Treasury-Postal Service, and VA-HUD. The problem with the omnibus approach is that thousands of unconstitutional activities are lumped together with legitimate legislation in one massive bill. Thus, big government is perpetuated with a minimum of accountability.

The Senate adopted the conference report on H. J. Res. 2 on February 13, 2003 by a vote of 76 to 20 (Roll Call 34). We have assigned pluses to the nays because this bill perpetuates huge amounts of unconstitutional federal spending.



On the Joint Resolution H.J.Res. 114: A joint resolution to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against Iraq.
Vote Date: October 11, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
War Authorization Against Iraq. This joint resolution (House Joint Resolution 114) authorizes the president "to use the Armed Forces of the United States as he determines to be necessary and appropriate in order to — (1) defend the national security of the United States against the continuing threat posed by Iraq; and (2) enforce all relevant United Nations Security Council resolutions regarding Iraq." However, since the Constitution gives Congress the sole responsibility for declaring war, this resolution represents congressional abdication of its responsibility.

Furthermore, the main thrust of the joint resolution is that the president is authorized to use the Armed Forces of the United States to "strictly enforce through the United Nations Security Council all relevant Security Council resolutions regarding Iraq." That is, the purpose of the resolution is to enforce UN Security Council dictates.

The Senate passed the resolution on October 11, 2002 by a vote of 77 to 23 (Roll Call 237). Because the Senate adopted the identical measure the House had passed the previous day, the Senate vote completed congressional action. We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Daschle Amdt No. 4481): To provide emergency disaster assistance to agricultural producers.
Vote Date: September 10, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agriculture Disaster Aid. During consideration of the appropriations bill for the Interior Department (H.R. 5093), Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) offered an amendment to provide almost $6 billion in "disaster" aid to farmers affected by drought. This new aid would be in addition to the money provided by the 10-year farm bill enacted last May. That bill will cost $781 billion according to Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas) raised a point of order against Daschle's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Daschle moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to his amendment, and his motion was agreed to on September 10, 2002 by a vote of 79 to 16 (Roll Call 212). We have assigned pluses to the nays. The Senate subsequently agreed to Daschle's amendment by voice vote.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 4492 to S.Amdt. 4491 to S.Amdt. 4471 to H.R. 5005: To amend title 49, United States Code, to improve flight and cabin security on passenger aircraft.
Vote Date: September 5, 2002Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Arming Commercial Pilots. During consideration of the bill to establish a cabinet-level Homeland Security Department (H.R. 5005), Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) offered an amendment that would establish a voluntary program to deputize qualified commercial pilots, who would then be allowed to be armed.

The Senate adopted the amendment on September 5, 2002 by a vote of 87 to 6 (Roll Call 210). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Conference Report H.R. 3009: A bill to extend the Andean Trade Preference Act, to grant additional trade benefits under that Act, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: August 1, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Trade Promotion Authority. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 3009 would give President Bush Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) for congressional consideration of trade agreements reached before June 1, 2005. President Bush has made it abundantly clear that he intends to use TPA to complete negotiations on the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) by early 2005. The FTAA could be modeled after the EU, but is designed to evolve toward a full-blown regional government at a greatly accelerated pace.

The Senate adopted the conference report on August 1, 2002 by a vote of 64 to 34 (Roll Call 207). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Graham Amdt. No. 4345): To amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide protection for all medicare beneficiaries against the costs of prescription drugs.
Vote Date: July 31, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Prescription Drug Plan. After the Senate rejected Sen. Bob Graham's (D-Fla.) Democratic proposal to establish a prescription drug plan (see Senate bill below), Graham worked out a scaled-down, "compromise" version of his plan with Republican Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Ore.)

[ During consideration of the drug patents bill (S. 812), Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.) offered an amendment "to provide coverage of outpatient prescription drugs under the Medicare program." As summarized by Congressional Quarterly, the drug prescription plan "would cover the vast majority of drug costs for low-income elderly and those who spend $4,000 or more a year on prescription drugs. But all seniors would receive at least a 5 percent discount." The total cost would be an estimated $400 billion over 10 years.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) raised a point of order against Graham's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to Graham's amendment, but Kennedy's motion was rejected on July 23, 2002 by a vote of 52 to 47 (Roll Call 186). ]

Sen. William Frist (R-Tenn.) raised a point of order against the Graham/Smith compromise amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Graham moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Graham/Smith amendment, but his motion was rejected on July 31, 2002 by a vote of 49 to 50 (Roll Call 199). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Rockefeller Amdt. No. 4316): To provide temporary State fiscal relief.
Vote Date: July 25, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Medical Assistance. Sen. John Rockefeller IV (D-W.V.) offered an amendment to another amendment to the drug patents bill to increase Medicaid and social service funding by $9 billion.

Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas) raised a point of order against Rockefeller's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to Rockefeller's amendment, and Reid's motion was agreed to on July 25, 2002 by a vote of 75 to 24 (Roll Call 190). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Graham Amdt. No. 4309): To amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide coverage of outpatient prescription drugs under the medicare program.
Vote Date: July 23, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Prescription Drug Plan. During consideration of the drug patents bill (S. 812), Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.) offered an amendment "to provide coverage of outpatient prescription drugs under the Medicare program." As summarized by Congressional Quarterly, the drug prescription plan "would cover the vast majority of drug costs for low-income elderly and those who spend $4,000 or more a year on prescription drugs. But all seniors would receive at least a 5 percent discount." The total cost would be an estimated $400 billion over 10 years.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) raised a point of order against Graham's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to Graham's amendment, but Kennedy's motion was rejected on July 23, 2002 by a vote of 52 to 47 (Roll Call 186). A three-fifths majority vote of the total Senate is needed to waive the Budget Act. We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Proceed S.J.Res. 34: A joint resolution approving the site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the development of a repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982.
Vote Date: July 9, 2002Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Nuclear Waste Storage. This measure (Senate Joint Resolution 34) would approve the federal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for developing a national repository for disposing high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. The amount of waste produced by nuclear energy is so small compared to the amount of energy generated that nuclear power plants have been able to store decades worth of spent fuel on-site. Yet a national repository is needed for the accumulating spent fuel.

The Senate on July 9, 2002 voted 60 to 39 for a motion to consider the measure (Roll Call 167). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3927 to S. 2514 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2003): To restore a previous policy regarding restrictions on use of Department of Defense facilities.
Vote Date: June 21, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Military Abortions. During consideration of the defense authorization bill (S. 2514), Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) offered an amendment to allow U.S. servicewomen and military dependents to obtain abortions at overseas U.S. military hospitals.

The Senate adopted the amendment on June 21, 2002 by a vote of 52 to 40 (Roll Call 160). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 2600: A bill to ensure the continued financial capacity of insurers to provide coverage for risks from terrorism.
Vote Date: June 18, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Terrorism Insurance. This bill (S. 2600) would create a new federal program for assuming much of the recovery costs from future, catastrophic terrorist attacks. The federal program would cover "80 percent of that portion of the amount of aggregate insured losses that ... exceeds the participating insurance company deductible required to be paid for those insured losses" up to $10 billion, and 90 percent of such losses between $10 billion and $100 billion. The program would terminate one year after the bill's enactment, unless the treasury secretary decides to extend it for an additional year. The Senate passed the bill on June 18, 2002 by a vote of 84 to 14 (Roll Call 157).

We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Gramm Amdt. No. 3833): To permanently repeal the death tax.
Vote Date: June 12, 2002Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Estate Tax Elimination. Last year's $1.35 trillion, 10-year tax-reduction package phases out the estate tax (a.k.a. the death tax), finally ending it in 2010. But this and other cuts in the bill are sunset after 2010, meaning that the cuts will be reversed in 2011 unless Congress makes the cuts permanent. This year, Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas) offered an amendment to H.R. 8 to eliminate permanently the estate tax.

Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) raised a point of order against Gramm's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Gramm moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to his amendment, but his motion was rejected on June 12, 2002 by a vote of 54 to 44 (Roll Call 151). A three-fifths majority vote of the total Senate is needed to waive the Budget Act. We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill S. 2578: A bill to amend title 31 of the United States Code to increase the public debt limit.
Vote Date: June 11, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Debt Limit Increase. This bill (S. 2578) would increase the legal limit on the national debt by $450 billion, from $5.95 trillion to $6.4 trillion. The Senate passed S. 2578 on June 11, 2002 by a vote of 68 to 29 (Roll Call 148).

We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 4775: A bill making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: June 7, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Supplemental Appropriations. The fiscal 2002 supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 4775) would provide $31.5 billion for "further recovery from and response to terrorist attacks" for the fiscal year ending September 30th, including $14 billion for the Defense Department, $5.8 billion for homeland security programs, and $5.5 billion for New York City post-September 11th recovery efforts. The bill, which is $1.4 billion more expensive than the House-passed version according to the budget committees, would also fund programs unrelated to the terrorist attacks, such as $2.5 million for mapping Hawaiian Coral Reefs. Supplemental appropriations are in addition to the funding already provided through the regular appropriations process.

The Senate passed the bill on June 7, 2002 by a vote of 71 to 22 (Roll Call 145). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3635 to H.R. 4775 (2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery From and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States): To strike the amount provided for the National Defense Center of Excellence for Research in Ocean Sciences.
Vote Date: June 6, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Coral Reef Mapping. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) offered an amendment to the supplemental appropriations bill to strike provisions earmarking $2.5 million for mapping the coral reefs in Hawaii. Noting the bill's title ("Making supplemental appropriations for further recovery from and response to terrorist attacks..."), McCain argued: "I knew of many devastating effects of the terrorist attacks on our homeland. I did not know of any disruption of the coral reefs in Hawaii associated with the terrorist attacks...."

A motion to table (kill) McCain's amendment was agreed to on June 6, 2002 by a vote of 65 to 31 (Roll Call 137). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3704 to H.R. 4775 (2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery From and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States): To strike the appropriation for Agricultural Research Service buildings and facilities.
Vote Date: June 6, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Agricultural Research Service. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) introduced an amendment to the fiscal 2002 supplemental appropriations bill to strike a provision that would provide $50 million for Agricultural Research Service (ARS) buildings and facilities at the National Animal Disease Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. McCain said that his amendment "would remove extraneous items from the supplemental and emergency appropriations bill." He also pointed out that the additional $50 million was not needed since $90 million had already been provided for the same purpose for fiscal 2002.

A motion to table (kill) McCain's amendment was agreed to on June 6, 2002 by a vote of 72 to 24 (Roll Call 138). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3597 to H.R. 4775 (2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery From and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States): To add the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002.
Vote Date: June 6, 2002Vote: AYEGood Vote.
International Criminal Court. Sen. John Warner (R-Va.) proposed an amendment to add the "American Servicemembers' Protection Act" to the supplemental appropriations bill. Warner argued that his amendment "would protect U.S. military personnel and other elected and appointed officials of the U.S. Government against potential criminal prosecution" by the International Criminal Court, a tribunal to which the U.S. is not a party. The amendment would authorize the president to "use all means necessary and proper" to release U.S. servicemen or officials detained by the court.

The Senate adopted Warner's amendment on June 6, 2002 by a vote of 75 to 19 (Roll Call 140). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Durbin Amdt. No. 3729): To increase the amount of supplemental appropriations for the Child Survival and Health Programs Fund.
Vote Date: June 6, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
AIDS Funding. The fiscal 2002 supplemental appropriations bill would provide $100 million for an additional U.S. contribution to the Global Fund to Combat AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) introduced an amendment to increase the new contribution from $100 million to $500 million. Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), who opposed the amendment, noted that "we have in this year's budget alone $12.5 billion committed to AIDS."

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.V.) raised a point of order against Durbin's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Durbin moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to his amendment, but his motion was rejected on June 6, 2002 by a vote of 46 to 49 (Roll Call 141). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3725 to H.R. 4775 (2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery From and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States): To increase the amount provided for the Child Survival and Health Programs Fund, and to impose conditions.
Vote Date: June 6, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
AIDS Funding. After rejecting Durbin's amendment to provide $500 million instead of $100 million in new funding for the Global Fund to Combat AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (see Senate Amendment below), the Senate considered an amendment by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) to make $200 million available for that purpose.

[ Durbin's amendment: The fiscal 2002 supplemental appropriations bill would provide $100 million for an additional U.S. contribution to the Global Fund to Combat AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) introduced an amendment to increase the new contribution from $100 million to $500 million. Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), who opposed the amendment, noted that "we have in this year's budget alone $12.5 billion committed to AIDS." ]

The Senate adopted Helms' amendment on June 6, 2002 by a vote of 79 to 14 (Roll Call 142). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Kennedy Amdt. No. 3608, as modified): To provide emergency school funding.
Vote Date: June 5, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Summer School Programs. Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) offered an amendment to the supplemental appropriations bill to provide $150 million in "emergency summer school funding" for the fiscal year ending September 30th. This funding would be in addition to the education funding already made available for the fiscal year.

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.V.) raised a point of order against Kennedy's amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. Kennedy moved to waive the Budget Act with respect to his amendment, but his motion was rejected on June 5, 2002 by a vote of 38 to 60 (Roll Call 132). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 3557 to H.R. 4775 (2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery From and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States): To strike section 1004 of the bill.
Vote Date: June 4, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Airline Bailout. The supplemental appropriations bill for fiscal 2002 (H.R. 4775) contained a provision that would have capped the amount of federal loan guarantees available to airlines for the remainder of the fiscal year. The Congressional Budget Office estimated that this provision would have lowered the total cost of the bill by $393 million in fiscal 2002.

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.V.) introduced an amendment to strike this provision of the bill. The Senate adopted his amendment on June 4, 2002 by a vote of 91 to 4 (Roll Call 131). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3009: A bill to extend the Andean Trade Preference Act, to grant additional trade benefits under that Act, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 23, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Trade Promotion Authority. This bill would authorize Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), formerly known as fast-track authority, for President Bush. (See description below for a summary of TPA).

[ Trade Promotion Authority. This bill (H.R. 3005) would give President Bush Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), formerly known as fast-track authority, to negotiate so-called free trade agreements. Under the TPA rules, Congress would only be allowed to vote yes or no on any free trade agreements presented to it by the Bush administration. President Bush has repeatedly stated that he would use TPA to complete negotiations for a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) by the end of his first term. Under the guise of "free trade," the FTAA would put us on the path to loss of sovereignty in a regional government of the Western Hemisphere, in the same manner that European nations are now losing sovereignty to the EU. ]

The Senate-passed version of the bill (H.R. 3009) was broader than the House-passed bill by not only including TPA but extending trade preferences for four Andean nations and substantially expanding federal Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), including new medical insurance subsidies for workers who lose their jobs to foreign competition. The TAA benefits expansion would cost an estimated $12 billion over 10 years.

The Senate passed H.R. 3009 on May 23, 2002 by a vote of 66 to 30 (Roll Call 130). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3167: A bill to endorse the vision of further enlargement of the NATO Alliance articulated by President George W. Bush on June 15, 2001, and by former President William J. Clinton on October 22, 1996, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 17, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
NATO Expansion. This bill (H.R. 3167) supports President Bush's plans to further expand NATO and authorizes military assistance to several countries in the former Soviet bloc. NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) was established as a regional arrangement under the United Nations for the ostensible purpose of containing Communism. Now that "post-Soviet" Russia is a partner in NATO, that rationale no longer applies. But NATO is still useful to the world order architects by providing the means to deploy troops for UN missions without placing those troops directly under the UN. It also commits the U.S. to defend any NATO member that is attacked.

The Senate passed H.R. 3167 on May 17, 2002 by a vote of 85 to6 (Roll Call 116). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3408 to S.Amdt. 3401 to H.R. 3009 (Trade Act of 2002): To limit the application of trade authorities procedures.
Vote Date: May 14, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Trade Promotion Authority. During consideration of the Trade Promotion Authority bill (H.R. 3009), Senator Mark Dayton (D-Minn.), in an effort to retain congressional power and preserve sovereignty, offered an amendment to enable a simple majority of senators to remove from fast-track authority any trade agreement provisions limiting U.S. trade remedy laws (e.g., anti-dumping measures). Under fast-track procedures, now called Trade Promotion Authority, senators must accept or reject entire trade agreements (without amendment) presented by the president.

The Senate rejected a motion to table (kill) Dayton's amendment on May 14, 2002 by a vote of 38 to 61 (Roll Call 110). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2646: To provide for the continuation of agricultural programs through fiscal year 2007, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: May 8, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Farm Bill. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 2646 amends and extends the major farm income support, land conservation, food assistance, trade promotion, rural development, research, forestry, and energy programs administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. When combined with estimated spending already authorized prior to enactment of this law, the Congressional Budget Office estimates that "H.R. 2646 will bring total spending for the above programs to $73.7 billion in 2002 ... and $869.3 billion over the 2002-2012 period. Of these totals, food assistance programs account for $51.3 billion in 2002 ... and $626.8 billion over the 2002-2012 period." Constitutionalists have denounced H.R. 2646 because it repudiates free-market principles and authorizes vast amounts of unconstitutional spending.

The Senate passed the final version (conference report) of the farm bill (H.R. 2646) May 8, 2002 by a vote of 64 to 35 (Roll Call 103). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3198 to S.Amdt. 2917 to S. 517 (National Laboratories Partnership Improvement Act of 2001): To decrease the United States dependence on imported oil by the year 2015.
Vote Date: April 25, 2002Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Automobile Fuel Consumption. During consideration of the energy bill (S. 517), Senator Tom Carper (D-Del.) offered an amendment to require new regulations for automobiles manufactured after model year 2006 to reduce oil consumption by at least one million barrels per day by 2015. Carper's amendment didn't specify how this objective would be achieved; possibilities include raising the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards or requiring alternative fuels.

The Senate tabled (killed) the Carper amendment on April 25, 2002 by a vote of 57 to 42 (Roll Call 90). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 3333 to S.Amdt. 2917 to S. 517 (National Laboratories Partnership Improvement Act of 2001): To strike the provisions relating to alternative vehicles and fuels incentives.
Vote Date: April 25, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Alternative Vehicles. During consideration of the energy bill (S. 517), Senator Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) offered an amendment to "strike the provisions relating to alternative vehicles and fuels incentives." Those provisions would provide $2.1 billion in credits for Americans who buy fuel cell, hybrid, and alternative fuel vehicles. The credit would vary depending on the vehicle; the average credit for an alternative fuel vehicle would be about $5,000.

The Senate tabled (killed) the Kyl amendment on April 25, 2002 by a vote of 91 to 8 (Roll Call 91). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 565: A bill to require States and localities to meet uniform and nondiscriminatory election technology and administration requirements applicable to Federal elections, to establish grant programs to provide assistance to States and localities to met those requirements and to improve election technology and the administration of Federal elections, to establish the Election Administration Commission, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: April 11, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Elections. The Senate-passed version of this legislation (S. 565) -- like the House-passed version would overhaul the nation's election procedures, including authorizing $400 million in one-time payments for states and counties to replace or upgrade punch card voting machines. The bill would also authorize $2.25 billion for states over three years to improve the administration of elections and mandate "minimum" federal election standards. This intervention by Congress in state elections threatens our federal system. According to Article 1, Section 4 of the Constitution, Congress is authorized to alter state election procedures for federal offices: "The times, places and manner of holding elections, for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the legislature thereof, but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations...." However, Founder Alexander Hamilton asserted that Congress should only use this authority to "make or alter such regulations" in "extraordinary circumstances."

The Senate passed S. 565 on April 11, 2002 by a vote of 99 to 1 (Roll Call 65). We have assigned a plus to the lone nay.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2356: A bill to amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to provide bipartisan campaign reform.
Vote Date: March 20, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Campaign Financing. This bill (H.R. 2356) would restrict our God-given right of free speech through banning "soft money" donations to national political parties and preventing issue ads from mentioning specific candidates within 60 days of a general election or 30 days of a primary. In contrast, the First Amendment to the Constitution states: "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom of speech...."

The Senate passed H.R. 2356 on March 20, 2002 by a vote of 60 to 40 (Roll Call 54). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2980 to S.Amdt. 2917 to S. 517 (National Laboratories Partnership Improvement Act of 2001): To prohibit the issuance of any permit which would authorize the transport of Alaska North Slope natural gas via a pipeline running offshore in the Beaufort Sea between Alaska and Canada.
Vote Date: March 6, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Alaskan Pipeline. During consideration of the energy bill (S. 517), Senator Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) offered an amendment to prohibit constructing a natural gas pipeline eastward from the Prudhoe Bay area through the adjacent coastal area of the energy-rich Alaska National Wildlife Refuge and on into Canada and the lower forty-eight states. This amendment would in effect mandate that the already-proposed natural gas pipeline from Prudhoe Bay to the lower forty-eight be constructed south from Prudhoe Bay through the Fairbanks area before entering Canada. Daschle argued that the southern route through Fairbanks would "avoid the environmental pitfalls that construction could have on the fragile northern Alaska environment." Senator Don Nickles (R-Okla.) opposed this Daschle amendment: "I would like to think we believe in the free market system enough to where we would let the marketplace decide what is the best route, what is the most economical route, what is the route that will do the least environmental damage ."

The Senate adopted Daschle's amendment on March 6, 2002 by a vote of 93 to 5 (Roll Call 41). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2850 to S.Amdt. 2471 to S. 1731 (Agriculture, Conservation, and Rural Enhancement Act of 2001): To express the sense of the Senate that the repeal of the estate tax should be made permanent by eliminating the sunset provision's applicability to the estate tax.
Vote Date: February 13, 2002Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Estate Tax. The tax-cut reconciliation bill enacted in 2001 phases out the estate tax, finally abolishing it in 2010. Unfortunately, this and the other tax-cut provisions in the bill are sunset after 2010, meaning that the tax cuts will be reversed in 2011 unless Congress acts to make the cuts permanent. During consideration of the farm bill (S. 1731), Senator Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) offered an amendment to express the sense of the Senate that the estate tax's repeal be made permanent. The farm bill is an appropriate vehicle for this "sense of the Senate" amendment since the estate tax, aka the death tax, has been responsible for liquidating family farms and other small privately owned businesses asset "rich" but cash poor.

The Senate adopted Kyl's amendment on February 13, 2002 by a vote of 56 to 42 (Roll Call 28). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2646: To provide for the continuation of agricultural programs through fiscal year 2007, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: February 13, 2002Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Farm Bill. The Senate version of the farm bill (S. 1731) would authorize $578.5 billion over 10 years for federal agriculture programs, including $73.4 billion in new spending above the Congressional Budget Office baseline.

Prior to voting on final passage, the Senate effectively adopted the House bill number (H.R. 2646) for the farm bill. The Senate passed its version of the legislation on February 13, 2002 by a vote of 58 to 40 (Roll Call 30). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Baucus Amdt No. 2839): To provide emergency agriculture assistance.
Vote Date: February 12, 2002Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Agriculture Emergency Assistance. During consideration of the farm bill (S. 1731), Senator Max Baucus (D-Mont.) offered an amendment to add an additional $2.4 billion to the bill for emergency agriculture assistance for (in Baucus' words) "farmers who suffered disasters in 2001."

A point of order was raised against Baucus' amendment on the basis of Budget Act restrictions. The Senate waived the Budget Act with respect to Baucus' amendment on February 12, 2002 by a vote of 69 to 30 (Roll Call 251). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 3061: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: December 20, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 3061 would appropriate $407.7 billion for fiscal 2002 for the Labor, Health and Human Services (HHS), and Education departments, including $123.4 billion in "discretionary" spending. This bill would provide more than $51 billion for federal aid to education, including funding for the education overhaul bill (H.R. 1) with its new annual state testing program. Total spending for HHS would increase by nearly 14 percent over fiscal 2001. The Education department would receive 15 percent more than last year.

The Senate adopted the conference report on December 20, 2001 by a vote of 90 to 7 (Roll Call 378). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 1: A bill to close the achievement gap with accountability, flexibility, and choice, so that no child is left behind.
Vote Date: December 18, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Education. Education. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 1 would overhaul education proposals to increase school accountability and reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) for six years. This bill would require states to test students in reading and math in grades three through eight annually, provide new accountability measures for schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress, and give schools greater flexibility to spend federal funds. It would include about $26.3 billion for federal elementary and secondary education programs and $13.5 billion for Title I programs for disadvantaged children in fiscal 2002. According to Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas): "H.R. I will lead to de facto, if not de jure, national testing.... Under the United States Constitution, the federal government has no authority to hold states 'accountable' for their education performance. In the free society envisioned by the founders, schools are held accountable to parents, not federal bureaucrats...."

The Senate adopted the conference report on December 18, 2001 by a vote of 87 to 10 (Roll Call 371). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 2472 to S.Amdt. 2471 to S. 1731 (Agriculture, Conservation, and Rural Enhancement Act of 2001): To replace the provision relating to the national dairy program with the provision from the bill passed by the House of Representatives.
Vote Date: December 11, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Dairy Subsidies. During consideration of the farm bill (S. 1731), Senator Michael Crapo (R-Idaho) offered an amendment that would have eliminated the bill's $2 billion subsidy program for dairy farmers.

The Senate tabled (killed) Crapo's amendment on December 11, 2001 by a vote of 51 to 47 (Roll Call 362). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2337 to H.R. 3338 (Department of Defense and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States Act, 2002): With respect to the protection of United States interests and the interest of American citizens and service members as it relates to the establishment of an International Criminal Court.
Vote Date: December 7, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
International Criminal Court. During consideration of the Defense appropriations bill (H.R. 3338), Senator Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) offered an amendment to protect U.S. military personnel and officials against prosecution "by an international criminal court to which the United States is not a party." His amendment would prohibit U.S. cooperation with the ICC and restrict U.S. involvement in peacekeeping missions unless the UN exempts U.S. soldiers from ICC prosecution. It would also authorize the president to rescue U.S. soldiers improperly handed over to the ICC.

Prior to voting on this amendment, the Senate considered an amendment by Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) that would have gutted Helms' amendment. Dodd's amendment stated that anyone who "commits crimes against humanity should be brought to justice" and that the president should have "the ability to cooperate with foreign tribunals and other international legal entities...."

The Senate rejected Dodd's amendment on December 7, 2001 by a vote of 48 to 51 (Roll Call 358). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 2336 to H.R. 3338 (Department of Defense and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States Act, 2002): To protect United States military personnel and other elected appointed officials of the United States Government against criminal prosecution by an international criminal court to which the United States is not a party.
Vote Date: December 7, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
International Criminal Court. The Helms amendment offered an amendment to protect U.S. military personnel and officials against prosecution "by an international criminal court to which the United States is not a party." His amendment would prohibit U.S. cooperation with the ICC and restrict U.S. involvement in peacekeeping missions unless the UN exempts U.S. soldiers from ICC prosecution. It would also authorize the president to rescue U.S. soldiers improperly handed over to the ICC.

The Helms amendment was adopted on December 7, 2001 by a vote of 78 to 21 (Roll Call 359). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2330: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 15, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agriculture Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 2330 would appropriate $75.9 billion for agriculture programs in fiscal 2002. This unconstitutional spending includes $31.9 billion for agricultural programs including crop subsidies, $23 billion for the food stamp program, $10.1 billion for child nutrition programs, and $1.1 billion for foreign food aid and export assistance.

The Senate adopted the conference report on November 15, 2001 by a vote of 92 to 7 (Roll Call 339). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2620: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 8, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
VA-HUD Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 2620 would appropriate $112.7 billion for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development and 20 independent agencies in fiscal 2002. HUD's portion is $30 billion. The agencies include NASA, the EPA, and FEMA. Congressmen arguing that they voted for this legislation to preserve VA programs should have voted against it, insisting that the myriad (and often unconstitutional) spending programs it contains be divided into separate parts, allowing for a vote on each.

The Senate adopted the conference report on November 8, 2001 by a vote of 87 to 7 (Roll Call 334). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3061: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: November 6, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations. The Senate version of this mammoth spending bill (H.R. 3061) would appropriate $407.6 billion in fiscal 2002, including $123.1 billion in "discretionary spending," for the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Departments, and related agencies. The spending includes $302.7 billion for HHS and $51.2 billion for the Education Department. Total spending would increase by nearly 12 percent over the previous fiscal year ($365 billion).

The Senate passed H.R. 3061 on November 6, 2001 by a vote of 89 to 10 (Roll Call 324). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 3162: A bill to deter and punish terrorist acts in the United States and around the world, to enhance law enforcement investigatory tools, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 25, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Anti-Terrorism Authority. The Senate adopted the House version of the anti-terrorism bill (H.R. 3162) without amendment on October 25, 2001.

H.R. 3162, known as the "USA Patriot Act," was passed by the House on October 24th, passed by the Senate the next day, and signed into law the day after that. The Act, introduced in response to the September 11th terrorist attacks, gives law enforcement and intelligence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. It expands the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts; increases the ability of law enforcement to secretly search homes and business records; expands the FBI's wiretapping and surveillance authority; and provides for nationwide jurisdiction for search warrants and electronic surveillance devices, including the legal extension of those devices to e-mail and the Internet. The bill includes a "sunset" provision under which the new surveillance powers "shall cease to have effect on December 31, 2005." The very presence of that provision underscores the justifiable concern of some lawmakers that those new powers could be abused.

The vote was 98 to 1 (Roll Call 313). We have assigned a plus to the nay.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2330: A bill making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 25, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Agriculture Appropriations. The Senate version of H.R. 2330 would appropriate $23 billion for the food stamp program, $1 billion more than in the House bill (see House version below).

[ House Version: H.R. 2330 would appropriate $74.4 billion for agriculture programs in fiscal 2002. The spending includes $31.8 billion for agricultural programs including crop subsidies, $22 billion for the food stamp program, $10.1 billion for child nutrition programs, and $1.1 billion for foreign food aid and export assistance. ]


The Senate passed H.R. 2330 on October 25, 2001 by a vote of 91 to 5 (Roll Call 315). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2506: A bill making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 24, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Foreign Aid. The Senate version of H.R. 2506 would appropriate $15.5 billion for foreign aid programs in fiscal 2002.

The Senate passed H.R. 2506 on October 24, 2001 by a vote of 96 to 2 (Roll Call 312). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 2217: A bill making appropriations for the Department of the Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 17, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Interior Appropriations. The final version (conference report) of H.R. 2217 would appropriate $19.1 billion in fiscal 2002 for the Interior Department and related agencies. The total spending in the bill was slightly higher than that of either the House- or Senate-passed versions of the legislation ($18.9 and $18.7 billion respectively). The Interior appropriations included $1.9 billion for the anti-private property Bureau of Land Management. It also included $125 million for the National Endowment for the Humanities and $115 million for the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Senate adopted the conference report on October 17, 2001 by a vote of 95 to 3 (Roll Call 304). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1447: A bill to improve aviation security, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 11, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Aviation Security. The Aviation Security Act (S. 1447) would federalize security at airports and make baggage and passenger screeners at the nation's 142 largest airports federal employees. (The attorney general could allow smaller, non-hub airports to use state or local law enforcement personnel.) S. 1447 would also provide for more air marshals on commercial flights and require the strengthening of the cockpit door and locks. And it would impose a $2.50 per passenger surcharge for each flight leg.

The Senate passed S. 1447 on October 11, 2001 by a vote of 100 to 0 (Roll Call 295). We have assigned minuses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1510: A bill to deter and punish terrorist acts in the United States and around the world, to enhance law enforcement investigatory tools, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: October 11, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Anti-Terrorism Authority. The Senate passed two versions of the antiterrorism bill: S. 1510 and H.R. 3162. The latter became law (see House bill below for a summary of the legislation in its final form) Russ Feingold (D-Wis.), who warned that the bill's new police and surveillance provisions threatened civil liberties, was the only senator to vote against S. 1510 and H.R. 3162.

[ Anti-Terrorism Authority. H.R. 3162, known as the "USA Patriot Act," was passed by the House on October 24th, passed by the Senate the next day, and signed into law the day after that. The Act, introduced in response to the September 11th terrorist attacks, gives law enforcement and intelligence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. It expands the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts; increases the ability of law enforcement to secretly search homes and business records; expands the FBI's wiretapping and surveillance authority; and provides for nationwide jurisdiction for search warrants and electronic surveillance devices, including the legal extension of those devices to e-mail and the Internet. The bill includes a "sunset" provision under which the new surveillance powers "shall cease to have effect on December 31, 2005." The very presence of that provision underscores the justifiable concern of some lawmakers that those new powers could be abused. ]

The Senate passed S. 1510 on October 11, 2001 by a vote of 96 to 1 (Roll Call 302). We have assigned a plus to the lone nay.



On Passage of the Bill H.J.Res. 51: A joint resolution approving the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment with respect to the products of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
Vote Date: October 3, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Vietnam Trade. House Joint Resolution 51 would allow the president to grant Normal Trade Relations (formerly Most Favored Nation trade status) to Vietnam on an annual basis. This status would reduce the tariffs on imports from the despotic Communist regime.

The Senate passed H. J. Res. 51 on October 3, 2001 by a vote of 88 to 12 (Roll Call 291). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 1450: A bill to preserve the continued viability of the United States air transportation system.
Vote Date: September 21, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Airline Bailout. After the September 11th terrorist attacks, the House voted on a bailout for the airline industry known as the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act (H.R. 2926). This Act would provide $5 billion in cash, and up to $10 billion in loan guarantees, for air carriers.

The Senate passed S. 1450 on September 21, 2001 by a vote of 96 to 1 (Roll Call 284). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 149: A bill to provide authority to control exports, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: September 6, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Export Administration Act Reauthorization. The Senate version of the export-control bill (S. 149) would give the Commerce Department the role of determining which dual-use technologies should be subject to export restrictions. In the House version of the bill the Commerce Department's role would be shared with the State and Defense Departments, which would presumably be more sensitive to America's foreign policy and national security interests. But both bills would eliminate current restrictions on the export of technology that is mass-marketed or readily available abroad.

The Senate passed 5. 149 on September 6, 2001 by a vote of 85 to 14 (Roll Call 275). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1231 to S.Amdt. 1214 to H.R. 2620 (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002): To make drug elimination grants for low-income housing available for the BuyBack America program.
Vote Date: August 2, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Gun Buyback Programs. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) offered an amendment to make available $15 million from the Housing Drug Elimination Program section of the VA-HUD appropriations bill "for the BuyBack America program, enabling gun buyback initiatives undertaken by public housing authorities and their local police departments."

The Senate voted 65 to 33 on August 2, 2001 to table (kill) the Schumer amendment (Roll Call 267). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2620: A bill making appropriations for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: August 2, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
VA-HUD Appropriations. The Senate version of H.R. 2620 would appropriate $113.4 billion for the Departments of Veteran Affairs and Housing and Urban Development and 20 independent agencies in fiscal 2002. The total appropriation is slightly more than that of the House version.

The Senate passed H.R. 2620 on August 2,2001 by a vote of 94 to 5 (Roll Call 269). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 1219 to S.Amdt. 1214 to H.R. 2620 (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002): To provide for a new national primary drinking water regulation for arsenic.
Vote Date: August 1, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Arsenic Standard for Drinking Water. During consideration of the VA-HUD appropriations bill (H.R. 2620), Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) offered an amendment intended to force the EPA to establish a stricter standard for arsenic in drinking water. Boxer argued that the current standard of 50 parts per billion was "way too high."

The Senate adopted the Boxer amendment on August 1, 2001 by a vote of 97 to 1 (Roll Call 265). We have assigned a plus to the lone nay.

In an October 31st letter to Congress, EPA Administrator Christie Whitman said the agency would adopt a standard, which must be met by 2006, of just 10 parts per billion. That's "the equivalent of one teaspoon per 1.3 million gallons of water" according to the New York Times! Compliance will be costly for rural communities that will have to spend heavily on water treatment facilities.




On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1190 to S. 1246 (Emergency Agricultural Assistance Act of 2001.): In the nature of a substitute.
Vote Date: July 31, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Supplemental Agriculture Assistance. Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) offered a substitute amendment that would have replaced the provisions of the bill to provide additional subsidies to farmers (S. 1246). Adopting the substitute amendment would have reduced the cost of the bill from $7.4 billion to $5.5 billion.

The Senate voted 52 to 48 on July 31st to table (kill) the substitute amendment (Roll Call 261). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 1065 to S.Amdt. 1030 to S.Amdt. 1025 to H.R. 2299: To prevent discrimination, in the application of truck safety standards, against Mexico by imposing any requirements on a Mexican motor carrier that seeks to operate in the United States that do not exist with regard to United States and Canadian motor carriers.
Vote Date: July 25, 2001Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Mexican Trucks. During consideration of the Transportation appropriations bill, Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas) offered an amendment to prohibit the imposition of safety requirements on Mexican trucks traveling in the U.S. that did not also apply to American and Canadian trucks. The intent behind the Gramm amendment was to open up American highways to Mexican long-haul trucks in support of the North American Free Trade (NAFTA) Agreement.

The Senate tabled (killed) the Gramm amendment on July 25, 2001 by a vote of 65 to 35 (Roll Call 250). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 2311: A bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 19, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Energy and Water Appropriations. H.R. 2311 would appropriate $25.1 billion for the Department of Energy, the Army Corps of Engineers, water projects, and related agencies in fiscal 2002. The lion's share of the money in the bill is for the Energy Department. The Senate version of H.R. 2311 would appropriate $1.4 billion more than that of the House version.

The Senate passed H.R. 2311 on July 19, 2001 by a vote of 97 to 2 (Roll Call 240). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 893 to H.R. 2217 (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002): To prohibit the use of funds to execute a final lease agreement for oil and gas development in the area of the Gulf of Mexico known as "Lease Sale 181".
Vote Date: July 12, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Oil and Gas Development in the Gulf of Mexico. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds in H.R. 2217 "to execute a final lease agreement for oil and gas development in the area of the Gulf of Mexico known as 'Lease Sale 181.'" The amendment would have blocked all new leases off Florida's Gulf coast.

The Senate voted 67 to 33 on July 12, 2001 to table (kill) the Nelson amendment (Roll Call 231). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 899 to H.R. 2217 (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002): To direct the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to take certain actions for the recovery of the lost river sucker and the shortnose sucker, and to clarify the operations of the Klamath Project in Oregon and California, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: July 12, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Klamath Basin. During consideration of H.R. 2217, Sen. Gordon Smith (R-Ore.) offered an amendment aimed at ending the federal policy that has denied water to, and devastated the livelihoods of, farmers in the Kiamath Basin of southern Oregon and northern California. The water was ostensibly withheld so that endangered suckerfish could survive a drought. Smith explained that his intent was "to go back to a biological opinion ... that would have permitted this drought to be managed as were the droughts in 1992 and 1994, in which the suckerfish survived, as did the agricultural community around it."

The Senate voted 52 to 48 on July 12, 2001 to table (kill) the Smith amendment (Roll Call 232). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 229 to H.Con.Res. 83: No Statement of Purpose on File.
Vote Date: July 11, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Oil and Gas Exploration in National Monuments. During consideration of the Interior Department appropriations bill (H.R. 2217), Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) offered an amendment to prohibit the use of funds in the bill "to conduct any preleasing, leasing, or other related activity under the Mineral Leasing Act ... or the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act" in areas designated as national monuments. "The purpose of my amendment is to stop oil and gas drilling on national monuments across the United States," Durbin explained. During his presidency, Bill Clinton expanded national monuments markedly through executive orders.

The Senate rejected a motion to table (kill) the Durbin amendment on July 11, 2001 by a vote of 42 to 57 (Roll Call 229). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 873 to S. 1077 (Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2001): Ensuring funding for defense and education and the supplemental appropriation by repealing tax cuts for 2001.
Vote Date: July 10, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Eliminating the Tax Rebates. During consideration of S. 1077, a supplemental appropriations bill, Sen. Ernest Hollings (D-S.C.) offered an amendment that would have repealed the rebates taxpayers received in the mail later in the year. Hollings argued that the federal government's "surplus" had disappeared and that the money for the rebate was needed for various programs -- citing specifically defense, education, and prescription drugs. "[D]on't throw the money around and then cry the rest of the year we don't have the money," he complained to his colleagues.

The Senate rejected the Hollings amendment on July 10, 2001 by a vote of 3 to 94 (Roll Call 223). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 863 to S. 1077 (Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2001): To increase the amount provided to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and to offset that increase by rescinding amounts appropriated to the Navy for the V-22 Osprey aircraft program.
Vote Date: July 10, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Global AIDS Funding vs. National Defense. Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.) offered an amendment to S. 1077 to increase funding for a global fund to combat AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis by $593 million, and to offset this increase by rescinding funds for the Navy's V-22 Osprey aircraft procurement account. Feingold claimed that his amendment offered a "clear choice" between allocating the funds "somewhat irrationally" (by which he meant the procurement account) and redirecting them towards "an unquestionably worthwhile purpose."

The Senate voted 79 to 20 on July 10, 2001 to table (kill) the Feingold amendment (Roll Call 225). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill H.R. 1: A bill to close the achievement gap with accountability, flexibility, and choice, so that no child is left behind.
Vote Date: June 14, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Education Spending Bill. This vote is similar to that described under House bill (below), except that it spends even more money in fiscal 2002 ($27.7 billion) and would authorize spending for an even longer period of time (through fiscal 2008).

[ Education Reauthorization. The "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001," the main elementary and secondary educational authorization bill for fiscal 2002, would increase spending for fiscal 2002 by an unbelievable 28 percent over fiscal 2001. The Congressional Budget Office estimated that the total cost of this bill (which, by the way, is only a portion of federal education spending) "would total approximately $23 billion in 2002 and about $135 billion over the 2002-2006 period...." ]

The Senate passed H.R. 1 on June 14, 2001 by a vote of 91-8 (Roll Call 192). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Conference Report H.R. 1836: A bill to provide for reconciliation pursuant to section 104 of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2002.
Vote Date: May 26, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Tax Cut Reconciliation Conference Report. This conference report is similar to H.R. 1836, in that it would cut all income tax rates slightly, double the per child tax credit from $500 to $1,000, alleviate the marriage penalty, phase out and finally abolish the estate tax in 2010, and increase income tax exemptions for IRAs and Educational Savings Accounts. Unfortunately, all provisions of the bill are sunset after 2010, meaning that the estate tax and current high income tax rates would be restored in 2011 unless Congress acts to make the cuts permanent. Despite this flaw, the bill would nevertheless give beleaguered taxpayers several much needed breaks in their tax bills.


The Senate adopted the conference report on May 26, 2001 by a vote of 58-33 (Roll Call 170). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 781 to H.R. 1836 (Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001): To reduce debt by eliminating the repeal of the estate tax.
Vote Date: May 22, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Death Tax Repeal. This vote is analogous to that described under House version (below), except that this amendment by Senator Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) would eliminate the estate tax repeal in the underlying tax cut bill.

[ House version: Death Tax Repeal. This legislation would phase out and completely repeal the Marxist federal inheritance tax that has been on the statute books since 1916. While opponents of the legislation painted the bill as a means of helping the rich, the truth is that this tax traditionally has put poor people out of work by liquidating family farms and small privately owned businesses that are asset "rich" but cash poor. No other tax contributes more to the trend toward the amalgamation of business into huge corporate empires than the death tax; the only way many small businesses and farms can stay in operation after the death of the owner is either through incorporation or through the sale of the private firm to a large corporation. ]

The Senate rejected the Conrad amendment to H.R. 1836 on May 22, 2001 by a vote of 42-57 (Roll Call 158). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive Wellstone Motion to Commit to the Committee on Finance): To establish a reserve account to provide funds for Federal education programs.
Vote Date: May 21, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Education Spending Increase ($120 Billion). During consideration of the income tax cut bill, Senator Paul Wellstone (D-Minn.) made this motion to recommit the bill to committee with instructions that the committee send the bill back with $120 billion less in income tax relief and $120 billion more in spending for federal education programs.

The Senate rejected a motion to waive the Budget Act point of order against the Wellstone amendment on May 21, 2001 by a vote of 41-58 (Roll Call 121). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion (Motion to Waive CBA re: Byrd Amdt. No. 703): To strike all marginal rate tax cuts except for the establishment of the 10 percent rate and strike all estate and gift tax provisions taking effect after 2006 in order to provide funds to strengthen social security, extend the solvency of the Social Security Trust Funds, maintain progressivity in the social security benefit system, continue to lift more seniors out of poverty, extend the solvency of the Medicare Trust Funds, and provide prescription drug benefits.
Vote Date: May 21, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Eliminate Income Tax Cuts. This amendment by Senator Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) would eliminate repeal of the estate tax and most of the income tax cuts in the bill and devote the additional tax revenue towards Social Security and a new Medicare prescription drug benefit.

The Senate rejected a move to waive the Budget Act point of order against the Byrd amendment on May 21, 2001 by a vote of 39-60 (Roll Call 122). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 659 to H.R. 1836 (Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001): To begin the phase-in of the elimination of the marriage penalty in the standard deduction in 2002 and to offset the revenue loss.
Vote Date: May 17, 2001Vote: NAYBad Vote.
Marriage Penalty Elimination. This amendment by Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) to the tax cut bill would eliminate the "marriage penalty" in the income tax laws by the year 2008 and substantially increase the standard deduction for married couples beginning in 2002.

The Senate rejected the Hutchison amendment to H.R. 1836 on May 17, 2001 by a vote of 27-73 (Roll Call 113). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 375 to S.Amdt. 358 to S. 1 (Better Education for Students and Teachers Act): To express the sense of the Senate regarding, and to authorize appropriations for, title II, part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, with respect to the development of high-qualified teachers.
Vote Date: May 8, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Federal Teacher Funding Increase. Senator Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) offered this amendment which would express the sense of the Senate that Congress should appropriate $3 billion in fiscal 2002 for the hiring of teachers. Under the Kennedy amendment, appropriations for such purposes would reach $6 billion by 2008. "This amendment says that we should fully fund the $3 billion which is in the authorization to make sure all the teachers who are going to be teaching poor children are qualified," Kennedy remarked. "It says we ought to add $500 million each additional year, so that in the last year there will be a total of $6 billion a year in funding..."

The Senate adopted the Kennedy amendment to S. 1 on May 8, 2001 by a vote of 69-31 (Roll Call 94). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 257 to S.Amdt. 170 to H.Con.Res. 83: To increase natural resources, environment, energy and other spending to ensure full funding of the Land Conservation, Preservation, and Infrastructure Improvement Program; to help preserve the core operating budgets of the major environmental agencies to provide appropriate funding for activities related to enforcement of environmental statutes and setting of standards that protect natural resources and the public's health; to address contaminated brownfield sites and urban sprawl and promote s
Vote Date: April 5, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Increase Environmental Spending by $50 billion. This amendment by Senator Jon Corzine (D-N.J.) would eliminate nearly $100 billion from the proposed tax cut and apply half the money toward federal environmental program increases (the other half would go toward debt reduction).

The Senate rejected the Corzine amendment to H. Con. Res. 83 on April 5, 2001 by a vote of 46-54 (Roll Call 77). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 176 to S.Amdt. 170 to H.Con.Res. 83: To provide emergency assistance to producers of agricultural commodities in fiscal year 2001, and additional funds for farm and conservation programs during fiscal years 2002 through 2001.
Vote Date: April 4, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Massive Agriculture Spending I Increase. Senator Pete Domenici (R-N.M.) explained that "this amendment would increase the spending on agriculture to a total of $98 billion, all of which will come out of the taxes we intend to give back to the American people."

The Senate rejected the amendment to H. Con. Res. 83 on April 4, 2001 by a vote of 47-53 (Roll Call 68). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 185 to S.Amdt. 170 to H.Con.Res. 83: To make certain that no child is left behind and to maintain fiscal discipline by making a major investment in education and a commensurate reduction in the share of tax relief given to the wealthiest one percent of Americans.
Vote Date: April 4, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Billions from Tax Cut to Education. This amendment by Senator Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) would eliminate $448 billion of the proposed tax cut and allot half the amount ($224 billion!) to increase education spending. The remainder would be applied to debt reduction, until the big spenders in Congress find some other way to spend it.

The Senate agreed to the Harkin amendment to H. Con. Res. 83 on April 4, 2001 by a vote of 53-47 (Roll Call 69). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 172 to S.Amdt. 170 to H.Con.Res. 83: To establish a prescription drug benefit under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act, without using funds generated from either the Medicare or Social Security surpluses, that is voluntary; accessible to all beneficiaries; designed to assist beneficiaries with the high cost of prescription drugs, protect them from excessive out of pocket costs, and give them bargaining power in the marketplace; affordable to all beneficiaries and the program; administered using private sector entities and compe
Vote Date: April 3, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
New $311 Billion Medicare Prescription Drug Boondoggle. Senator Max Baucus (D-Mont.) offered this amendment to double the funds for a new prescription drug benefit under Medicare. "It basically doubles the amount that is available from $153 billion to $311 billion.... To offset the cost, our amendment reduces the size of the tax cut by $158 billion."

The Senate rejected the amendment on April 3, 2001 by a vote of 50-50 (Roll Call 66). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 27: A bill to amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to provide bipartisan campaign reform.
Vote Date: April 2, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
McCain-Feingold Campaign Finance. The intent behind the McCain-Feingold Campaign Finance bill is to squelch criticism of government and elected officials. The bill would further limit contributions by organizations and corporations to political parties and require most organizations criticizing federal elected officials to file financial reports with the FEC. Regulations under McCain-Feingold and Shays-Meehan (the corresponding House version of the bill) would essentially require disclosure of the names and political finances of political activists. The bill would not abolish or directly restrict free speech and free press. But requiring disclosure is a measure of political control by intimidation.

The Senate passed S. 27 on April 2, 2001 by a vote of 59-41 (Roll Call 64). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 158 to S. 27 (Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001): To provide candidates for election to Federal office with the opportunity to respond to negative political advertisements sponsored by noncandidates.
Vote Date: March 29, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Require Broadcasting Stations to Give Free Airtime to Federal Candidates. This amendment to the McCain-Feingold campaign finance bill would require broadcasting stations airing criticisms of political candidates to give those candidates free airtime in the same time slots to respond to the criticisms. The amendment is a clear violation of the First Amendment protection of freedom of the press, but the extent to which it protects political incumbents is not discernable until one notices that the amendment includes no exemption if the media organ is doing the criticism itself (rather than running paid advertisements from a citizen group). As such, under this amendment conservative talk radio would be virtually co-hosted by far-left political candidates.

The Senate tabled (killed) this amendment to S. 27 on March 29, 2001 by a vote of 72-28 (Roll Call 60). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Amendment S.Amdt. 148 to S. 27 (Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001): To amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to provide partial public financing for Senate candidates who abide by voluntary spending limits.
Vote Date: March 27, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Partial Federal Financing of Congressional Elections. This amendment would set up the same unnecessary and constitutionally unauthorized taxpayer campaign subsidy system for congressmen as already exists for presidential candidates. Noting that only 12 percent of taxpayers checked the box on their income tax forms last year to fund presidential elections, Senator Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) stated: "Clearly, this is an idea that is overwhelmingly unpopular with the American people."

The Senate rejected the amendment to S. 27 on March 27, 2001 by a vote of 30-70 (Roll Call 52). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On the Joint Resolution S.J.Res. 4: A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relating to contributions and expenditures intended to affect elections.
Vote Date: March 26, 2001Vote: NAYGood Vote.
Constitutional Amendment to Allow LP Federal Regulation of Political Speech. This vote was on the adoption of a constitutional amendment to give Congress "power to set reasonable limits on the amount of contributions that may be accepted by, and the amount of expenditures that may be made by, in support of, or in opposition to, a candidate for nomination for election to, or for election to, Federal office." The amendment is an outright attack on the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Senator Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) explained that "the Hollings constitutional amendment [sums] up the reformers' agenda for the past quarter century as they have sought to root out of American political life any speech or activity which could conceivably affect an election or be of value to a politician."

The Senate rejected S. J. Res 4 on March 26, 2001 by a vote of 40-56 (Roll Call 47). We have assigned pluses to the nays.



On Passage of the Bill S. 420: An original bill to amend title 11, United States Code, and for other purposes.
Vote Date: March 15, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Bankruptcy Overhaul. As the National Chamber of Commerce noted in its analysis of the bankruptcy reform bill, this legislation was aimed at the "more than 100,000 bankruptcy filers [who] are abusing the system every year by discharging debts that they have the ability to repay." Under this underlying bipartisan bill, "Abusers of the bankruptcy system, those median income who earn more than the and can afford to repay a significant portion of their debts, will be required to pay back what they can afford." This legislation would allow persons saddled with unexpected medical bills or other hardships a fresh start through bankruptcy while generally preventing the abusive or habitual use of bankruptcy by sheltering fewer assets from seizure under bankruptcy proceedings.

The Senate passed S. 420 on March 15, 2001 by a vote of 83-15 (Roll Call 36). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 93 to S. 420 (Bankruptcy Reform Act of 2001): To provide a complete substitute.
Vote Date: March 14, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
A Bankruptcy Overhaul -- Democratic Substitute. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) explained that this Democratic substitute amendment would gut the provisions of the underlying bill (S. 420 -- Bankruptcy Reform Act of 2001): "Frankly, it is just an amendment that would substitute the current legislation with the bankruptcy reform bill that passed the Senate in the 105th Congress."

The Senate tabled (killed) the amendment to S. 420 on March 14, 2001 by a vote of 64-35 (Roll Call 27). We have as signed pluses to the yeas.



On the Joint Resolution S.J.Res. 6: A joint resolution providing for congressional disapproval of the rule submitted by the Department of Labor under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, relating to ergonomics.
Vote Date: March 6, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Ergonomics Regulation Repeal. Congress had long demonstrated a complete lack of interest in enacting ex-pensive and unconstitutional national ergonomics standards. So President Bill Clinton dumped onerous OSHA-instituted ergonomics rules on the American people in the closing days of his administration, and arranged for those rules to take effect a mere four days before the inauguration of George W. Bush. "Ergonomics" is the design of equipment and work environments to best suit a worker's health and productivity, and ergonomic regulations are generally federal rules mandating standards of worker comfort in the workplace. Representative Tom Davis (R-Va.) described the expansive scope of the OSHA regulations: "By OSHA's own estimates, this ergonomic rule will cover over 102 million employees, 18 million jobs, and 6.1 million businesses and cost almost $100 billion a year to implement." Passage of S. J. Res. 6 would provide congressional disapproval of the OSHA ergonomics rule and declare that the "rule shall have no force or effect."

The Senate adopted the joint resolution on March 6, 2001 by a vote of 56-44 (Roll Call 15). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



On Passage of the Bill S. 248: A bill to amend the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001, to adjust a condition on the payment of arrearages to the United Nations that sets the maximum share of any United Nations peacekeeping operation's budget that may be assessed of any country.
Vote Date: February 7, 2001Vote: AYEBad Vote.
Release of $582 million in UN "Dues." This bill would release $582 million to the United Nations as a second of three payments to the world body for "back dues" allegedly owed by the United States. The UN -- in accordance with the intent of the new world order elite -- has become more aggressive in recent years in its pursuit of the powers of a world tyranny. The world body is seeking, through its International Criminal Court treaty, the power to bring any person in the world to trial. The UN is also seeking a global tax power and has proposed a global ban of private ownership of firearms. The Senate passed the bill on February 7, 2001 by a vote of 99-0 (Roll Call 10).

We have assigned minuses to the yeas.



On the Nomination PN107: John Ashcroft, of Missouri, to be Attorney General
Vote Date: February 1, 2001Vote: AYEGood Vote.
Ashcroft Nomination. The nomination of former Senator John Ashcroft to be U.S. attorney general was a key vote because he had aroused the ire of the Left. Although Ashcroft had compiled one of the more conservative voting records during his six years in the Senate, earning a cumulative "Conservative Index" rating of 76 percent, during the confirmation hearings he pledged to consolidate the Clinton-era gains of the Left on abortion, gun control, and other issues. As a result, only the more radical leftists opposed Ashcroft's nomination.

The Senate approved the Ashcroft nomination on February 1, 2001 by a vote of 58-42 (Roll Call 8). We have assigned pluses to the yeas.



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