If the “fiscal cliff” controversy isn’t enough to convince you this government is one big fraud, what will it take? The budget mess was delivered to us by the same people who every step of the way claimed to be acting in our best interest. Let that sink in. Every president and every member of Congress assured us that their fiscal policies would produce prosperity and employment.

The issue of so-called same-sex "marriage” will soon come before the Supreme Court. I am no betting man, but if I were, I would gamble every dime to my name that before long, “gay marriage” will be the law of the land. I would further bet that those right-leaning politicians and their allies within the alternative media who have insisted upon preserving the heterosexual character of marriage will succumb to a deafening silence not long after that.

With all the talk about taxing the rich, we hear very little talk about taxing the poor. Yet the marginal tax rate on someone living in poverty can sometimes be higher than the marginal tax rate on millionaires.

President Obama says he wants more jobs, a “top priority,” plus a growing small business sector, the section of the economy that creates the majority of new jobs, and more income redistributed from the “top 2 percent” to the government.

Attempting to show that those incompatible positions aren’t incompatible, Mr. Obama injected the same misleading statement into his news conference at four different points.

Let me see if I have this right. Earlier this year, while campaigning for re-election, Barack Obama said he wanted to raise taxes $800 billion on everyone making more than $250,000 a year. Republicans were virtually unanimous in shouting, “No way!”

Then what happened when the Spender in Chief wins the White House for another four years? He promptly doubled down. Now, he says he wants $1.6 trillion in new taxes over the next 10 years. And our “don’t call my bluff” President made it abundantly clear that he’ll play hardball to get it.

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