Walter WilliamsIf there is anything good to say about Democrat control of the White House, Senate and House of Representatives, it's that their extraordinarily brazen, heavy-handed acts have aroused a level of constitutional interest among the American people that has been dormant for far too long. Part of this heightened interest is seen in the strength of the tea party movement around the nation. Another is the angry reception that many congressmen received at their district town hall meetings. Yet another is seen by the exchanges on the nation's most popular radio talk shows such as Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Mark Levin and others. Then there's the rising popularity of conservative/libertarian television shows such as Glenn Beck, John Stossel and Fox News.

Becky AkersA rebellion’s brewing out there over the US census, and rightfully so. You don’t need to be a Tea Partier to object to the intrusive questionnaire — even if the form this year is “One of the shortest…in history -- 10 Questions in 10 Minutes.”

Ralph ReilandWhat became quickly obvious while watching President Obama’s recent interview about healthcare reform with Bret Baier on FOX is that we’re still not getting straight answers about the proposed reforms — and this after a year of healthcare being the No. 1 priority at the Obama White House.

Open carry laws in the State of Wisconsin have gotten a lot of attention lately, most recently from the BBC. In a column titled "Armed and ready to shop," posted by the BBC on March 11, North America editor Mark Mardell recounts his experience following Nick Clark and Kim Garny as they go about their daily business in the Milwaukee area while openly bearing arms on their hips.

Walter WilliamsStephen Dinan's Washington Times article "Climate Scientist to Fight Back at Skeptics," (March 5, 2010) tells of a forthcoming campaign that one global warmer said needs to be "an outlandishly aggressively partisan approach" to gut the credibility of skeptics. "Climate scientists at the National Academy of Sciences say they are tired of 'being treated like political pawns' and need to fight back…" Part of their strategy is to form a nonprofit organization and use donations to run newspaper ads to criticize critics. Stanford professor and environmentalist Paul Ehrlich, in one of the e-mails obtained by the Washington Times said, "Most of our colleagues don't seem to grasp that we're not in a gentlepersons' debate, we're in a street fight against well-funded, merciless enemies who play by entirely different rules."

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