With the issue of gay "marriage" assuming national significance, we would be well served to familiarize ourselves with the arguments of 19th-century conservative theorist Louis de Bonald against divorce as we rethink the nature and purpose of marriage.

It has long seemed to me that there is far more rationality in sports, and in commentaries on sports, than there is in politics and in commentaries on politics. What has puzzled me is why this is so, when what happens in politics has far more serious effects on people's lives.

Evident in Olympic rule application is something I wrote about mere days ago: the triumph of Muslim absolutism over Western relativism. Whether Muslims are right or wrong in a given instance, they’re sure of themselves in every instance. They don’t capitulate, waver, or apologize. They’re brazen. And Westerners? They’re craven. Even the values they profess most — brotherhood, tolerance, sensitivity, open-mindedness, antipathy for discrimination — are situational. Like athletes, these values are subject to expulsion when inconvenient.

Senator Rand Paul began with a story that got a huge laugh from standing-room-only crowd at FreedomFest. “As you may know,” he said, “I have sort of a love/hate relationship with the TSA.” He paused and then added, “Well, let’s be honest. It’s more of a hate/hate relationship.”

Dog Days movieThe latest installment of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, Dog Days, proves to be an entertaining film, particularly for avid readers of the graphic novels (fictional stories that are presented in comic-strip format and published as books). Much of the humor and plot devices will likely appeal more to younger audiences, but certain elements in the movie may redeem it for adult moviegoers.

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