Several key witnesses in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin by Neighborhood Watch captain George Zimmerman have changed their original stories since first being interviewed by law enforcement, according to news reports about recently released evidence in the case. Some analysts cited in the media speculated that three of those revised accounts might hurt the shooter’s claims of self-defense as the second-degree murder prosecution goes through the Florida court system.

Experts in the field, however, have noted that later recollections — which could be impacted by external factors such as publicity, for example — are thought to be less reliable than earlier memories. And the addition of post-event information into the memory reconstruction process, normally unbeknownst to the person, is one reason why psychologists believe that eyewitness testimony can often be unreliable.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerburg will find himself in court once again over yet another shareholder lawsuit. This time, shareholders have filed a lawsuit against Facebook and several banks, including Morgan Stanley, asserting that the defendants have “concealed a weakened growth forecast prior to the high-profile IPO,” reports Fox News. And the litigation has prompted the United States Congress to take a closer look at Facebook.

Leftist Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz says special prosecutor Angela Corey should drop the second-degree murder charge against George Zimmerman, the Hispanic man who shot Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Florida.

The evidence that Zimmerman told the truth when he said Martin attacked and tried to kill him, Dershowitz wrote in the New York Daily News, is too much to ignore. And the only right thing for the prosecutor to do, he concluded, is forget about nailing Zimmerman for murder.

As Congress drags its feet on charging disgraced Attorney General Eric Holder with contempt for unlawfully covering up the deadly “Fast and Furious” gun-running scandal, a respected documentary maker decided to create Blood on Their Hands, a film exposing the Obama administration’s crimes. Activists and analysts celebrated the news, calling it a positive step forward in getting to the truth about the weapons-trafficking scheme that saw the U.S. government arm violent Mexican drug cartels using American tax money.

 

JPMorgan Chase's $2 billion trading loss has predictably generated calls for more bank regulation. But one free-market advocate, Dan Amoss of the Daily Reckoning made this suggestion: "Here’s an idea: it’s called 'capitalism.' Take away the subsidies and bailouts for banks, along with the regulatory red tape. If they want to blow themselves up, fine — but losses would fall on the risk managers making those decisions and bank shareholders, not taxpayers or depositors…."

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