Thursday, 12 September 2019

August Border Number Dips, but Nearly 1M Likely to Have Crossed Border by Sept. 30

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The tsunami of penniless illegal aliens crashing through the border dropped again in August and was less than half the number that flowed across in May, the latest report from Customs and Border Protection shows.

Border Patrol agents collared a shade more than 60,000 illegals, down from close to 150,000 four months ago.

A small wrinkle in the data is the number of “inadmissible” arriving at ports of entry. That figure increased 32 percent, meaning 100 percent of the decrease in the total came in the number of illegals caught trying to jump the border between ports.

Regardless, the number is still too high. More than 2,000 illegals are entering the country every day — and those are only the ones we know about.

Since 2014, border agents have caught nearly 3.5 million illegals.

The Data
Total apprehensions of border jumpers and illegals at ports of entry was 64,006, a 22-percent drop from July’s 82,055. But the dive is even more significant when measured from year-high May, when 144,255 were caught. That decline was 55.6 percent.

The total for fiscal 2019 is now 926,769. If the Border Patrol continues apprehending illegals at the rate set in August, about 2,065 per day that will add another 64,006 to the total, 990,775 illegals will have sought to colonize the country by fiscal year’s end on September 30.

Illegals caught between ports in August was 50,693. That 29.6-percent decrease from July’s 71,982 accounted, again, for all total drop in numbers.

Broken down, the numbers are these:

• Unaccompanied minors: 3,729

• Family units: 25,057

• Single adults: 21,907

The key figure there is family units. That number dipped 41.1 percent from July’s 42,546. The number of unaccompanied minors dropped 33 percent from 5,563.

The number from August in this category — again, illegals caught between ports — brings the total for this fiscal year to 811,016.

• Unaccompanied minors: 72,873

• Family units: 457,871

• Single adults: 280,272

Inadmissibles stopped at ports of entry increased 32.1 percent from 10,073 to 13,313.

• Unaccompanied minors: 396

• Family units: 5,993

• Single adults: 6,838

• Accompanied minors: 86

Family units increased 37.3 percent from July’s 4,364, while single adults increased 28.3 percent. Unaccompanied minors jumped 35.6 percent.

Total inadmissibles apprehended at ports of entry for the year is 115,753:

Unaccompanied minors: 4,235

• Family units: 47,965

• Single adults: 62,674

• Accompanied minors: 879

Frighteningly, nearly all the “families” that agents catch are quickly released to disappear into the country. Even worse, as The New American reported last month, DNA testing found that nearly 6,000 families were fakes; i.e., the illegals lied because they know the border agents will let them go.

Testifying before a Senate committee in July, the nation’s top border official, Mark Morgan, said that agents, one day in June, faced a group of 1,000 illegals who crossed the border at one time, the largest large group, as they are called, ever encountered.

As well, he said, border agents are housing as many as 20,000 illegals in facilities that “were simply not set up to process and care for a population of this size and demographics.”

“The system,” he said, “is overwhelmed.”

Overwhelmed at the Border
Despite the drop, the numbers really don’t improve matters much overall. The 990,775 who will have crossed during fiscal 2019 if the rate from August continues will nearly double last year’s total: 521,090.

And that 90-percent increase from 2018-2019 will more than double the number from 2017: 415,517. Indeed, that number had more than doubled in July when the figure reached 862,785.

The CBP data show that the border has been under siege since at least 2014, when border agents caught 569,237 illegals. That year, and in 2016 and 2018, the number topped 500,000. It surpassed 400,000 in 2015 and, again, 2017.

The total from 2014 through August 2019 is 3,430,850.

Photo: Benny Winslow / iStock / Getty Images Plus

 

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