Even with only  modest cuts in the continuing resolution bill offered by the GOP-controlled House of Representatives, it is highly unlikely to see the light of day when the Senate returns from recess, just before the March 4th deadline. Despite strong rhetoric from House Speaker John Boehner who said �When we say we�re going to cut spending, read my lips. We are going to cut spending, � this reminded one of the identical words (�read my lips�) uttered by Republican Presidential candidate George H. W. Bush in 1988, which cost him his chance for re-election in 1992 when he voted for higher taxes the year before. Boehner�s words also generated a protest of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid who accused Boehner of threatening to shut down the entire government unless the House�s agenda was accepted. 

Madison rallyAfter several days of enormous demonstrations organized by socialists, government-worker unions, and Democrats, a coalition of conservative and Tea Party groups rallied on Saturday, February 19, in Madison, Wisconsin, to support newly elected Republican Gov. Scott Walker and his proposals to rein in a massive budget deficit while reducing the power of state- and municipal-employee unions.

In what amounts to the next initiative undertaken by the Obama administration toward its escalating program of government expansion and nationalization of various aspects of the lives of the American people (such as the government takeover of health care, intervention in banks, and the nationalization of various automobile companies such as General Motors), the federal government is now embarking upon a program of government-directed wireless internet (Wi-Fi) delivery.

As calls for cuts in the defense budget increased, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates knew what he would have to do: throw the cutters a bone, and then dig in against any further reductions. By admitting that he could shave $78 billion out of the defense budget over the next five years, Gates then went to work defending any further suggested incursions into the future spending plans by the military-industrial complex.

Rick ScottThe Obama administration’s $53-billion high-speed rail proposal, which has attracted a host of critics in the midst of a $14 trillion federal debt crisis, has been quickly rejected by at least three Governors in states where rail projects were already on the drawing table.

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