Branded as the “violence tax,” Cook County officials in Illinois are proposing a tax increase on guns and ammo, with the intent to curb violent crime and help close its expansive budget gap. Homicides in Chicago have boosted a staggering 25 percent this year, according to MyFoxChicago.com, and some officials are using the tragedy as a pretense to dilute the number of guns and ammunition in circulation.

The mayor of Lewiston, Maine, is in hot water for telling immigrant Somalis that when they land in his city, he expects them to shed their native culture and become Americans.

The remarks have sent leftists in the state into a rage, demanding that Mayor Robert MacDonald resign.

MacDonald hasn’t apologized and he isn’t going to resign.

In the last 10 years, Somalis have flooded the city thanks to the resettlement efforts of the religious left, and they are draining the city’s welfare resources.

On October 9, the Supreme Court denied review of an appeal court ruling upholding the constitutionality of the Federal Information Securities Amendments Act (FISA).

The FISA Amendments Act was signed into law by President George W. Bush on July 10, 2008 after being overwhelmingly passed 293 to 129 in the House and 69-28 in the Senate.

At issue in the case the Supreme Court refused to hear, Hepting, et al v. AT&T, et al, was the government’s use of provisions of FISA to grant retroactive protection from prosecution to several telecommunications giants including AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint. These companies aided the government in wiretapping the phones of subscribers without obtaining a warrant.

As conservative journalists and television pundits praise Mitt Romney for “hammering” President Obama during his foreign policy speech Monday at the Virginia Military Institute, a closer reading reveals very little difference between the two major party candidates on issue that are important to constitutionalists. presidential candidate. Romney promised to continue growing government and using the American military to "promote democracy" in the Middle East and elsewhere.

The supersized soda ban in New York City likely has the soft drink industry on high alert. Perhaps that is why Coca-Cola, Pepsi, and Dr Pepper have decided to release new vending machines that post the calorie counts of each of the soda products.

The Associated Press writes, “The counts will be on the buttons of the machines, which will also feature small posted messages reminding the thirsty that they can choose a low-calorie drink.”

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